Traffic Lights Turned On At Gas Well And Ciechanski Road

first_imgShannon McCarthy with the Department of Transportation: “The traffic signals have been turned on so be aware of that, and be ready to stop on red.”  Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Kalifornsky Beach Road users may have noticed that the new traffic lights were switched on at both Gas Well and Ciechanski Road. DOT, in cooperation with Knik Construction Company, installed two new signal systems at Gas Well and Ciechanski Road, and updated the signals at Bridge Access and Poppy Lane. The roadway has been resurfaced, striped and new signs installed. Upon project completion, speed limits in the area will remain the same. Work on K-Beach will continue to be carried out on weekdays between 8:00pm and 6:30am, until the end of October, weather permitting.last_img

2020 Ford Explorer goes rearwheel drive gains serious tech

first_img Ford 2019 Cadillac Escalade review: Large, luxurious and long in the tooth Since launching in 1991, nearly 8 million Ford Explorers have been sold, making it the best-selling SUV of all time. Today, the current model sitting in showrooms remains the top selling three-row SUV on the market — even though it debuted way back in 2011 and contends with a number of fresher entries. Come this summer, however, it will shed its class graybeard status when the 2020 Ford Explorer lands in showrooms sporting new styling, new technology, a new platform and a broader drivetrain lineup. The all-new crossover made its debut Wednesday before being put on display at the Detroit Auto Show next week. Detroit Auto Show 2019 Feb 7 • Chevy’s full-scale Lego Silverado is plastic fantastic in Chicago reading • 2020 Ford Explorer goes rear-wheel drive, gains serious tech 57 Photos Crossovers SUVs Share your voice Tags 2016 Ford Explorer review: Go road-tripping in Ford’s updated, EcoBoost-powered SUV null Feb 4 • 2020 Kia Telluride: Detroit Auto Show debut turns Super Bowl ad star Jan 22 • Our highlights of the 2019 Detroit Auto Show Now playing: Watch this: See All 2020 Ford Explorer is better in almost every way May 14 • History of the Toyota Supra, a Japanese sports car legend The engine gets mated with a 10-speed automatic transmission routing power to rear wheels or to all corners through a rear-biased all-wheel drive system with axle disconnect that’s available with a seven-mode Terrain Management System. Towing capacity for the four punches in at 5,300 pounds, but fuel economy figures aren’t available yet. Ford is simply promising better efficiency and driving range than before. For reference, the outgoing Explorer with the 2.3-liter and front-wheel drive has an EPA estimated fuel economy of 19 mpg in the city and 27 mpg on the highway, and 18 mpg city and 25 mpg highway with all-wheel drive. Those looking for more oomph will want to look at the Platinum model, which packs a 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged V6 with 365 horses, a stout 380 pound-feet of torque, all-wheel drive and 5,600-pound tow capacity. As for other drivetrain offerings, a hybrid and performance-focused ST model are confirmed to be on the way.2020-ford-explorer-limited-4Enlarge ImageThe 2020 Ford Explorer lineup will also include a hybrid and performance ST model. Ford Sales of the 2020 Ford Explorer will begin this summer with a $33,860 base price representing a $400 increase over the 2019 model. The lineup will include the base Explorer, XLT, Limited, Limited Hybrid, ST and Platinum trims. Besides the less-than-groundbreaking exterior design, the new Explorer has some drastic improvements with more space, tech and promise of improved efficiency that likely will give it a good shot at defending its title as the best-selling three-row SUV. • 2020 Ford Explorer is a more efficient, spacious and… From the exterior design standpoint, the sixth-generation Explorer’s appearance is best described as an evolution of today’s model. Up front, there’s a new grille shape, light housings and shorter front overhangs for a bit more ground clearance and better approach angle for off-road excursions. From the side, the subtle changes are more noticeable, with a tapering roofline and more sculpted profile surfaces, but overall the exterior redo is underwhelming and looks like it could’ve been seen on the road for a couple of years already.Alterations inside are more apparent with new multicontour seats, tiered dash design and more spacious accommodations. That’s thanks in large part to a 6.3-inch longer wheelbase that Ford says gives the new Explorer best-in-class first- and second-row hip room and second- and third-row headroom. Enlarge ImageThe exterior of the new Ford Explorer doesn’t fall far from the outgoing model. Ford Cargo capacity is also at the top of the class with 87.8 cubic feet of space available behind the first row seats and offering the ability to carry 4×8 sheets of plywood for the first time. Other available interior niceties include heated and cooled massaging seats up front, individual climate controls in all three rows and a bigger panoramic roof.  On the tech front, an updated Sync 3 system with an 8-inch touchscreen, Wi-Fi hotspot for up to 10 devices, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capabilities are standard. A 10.1-inch portrait touchscreen interface is optional, along with a 14-speaker B&O audio setup. Top Platinum models also benefit from a standard 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster, with varying 3D animated graphics depending on which drive mode is selected in Explorers equipped with the Terrain Management System.To juice up smart devices, the Explorer offers a wireless charge pad up front, up to three 12-volt outlets, two USB-A and two USB-C ports and a 110-volt three-prong outlet. 2020-ford-explorer-platinum-7Enlarge ImageAn available 10.1-inch portrait touchscreen interface is one of the more substantial changes inside. Ford For safety, forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring, lane-keep assist and rear cross-traffic alert come on all Explorers, while intelligent adaptive cruise control with traffic sign recognition, reverse brake assist and a 360-degree camera are offered on midlevel trims on up. Everything rides on a new rear-wheel-drive architecture shared with the Lincoln Aviator that Ford says make the Explorer a little more rugged and capable, while also being on average 200 pounds lighter than the outgoing car. Base models tip the scale at 4,345 pounds. Standard power now comes from a 2.3-liter turbocharged four with 300 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque, meaning the old 3.5-liter V6 is no more. Detroit Auto Show 2019 Ford 3:30 0 More From Roadshow 2020 Cadillac CT6 first drive: Going out with a Blackwing banglast_img read more

TMO Demands Extension Of Deadline For Harvey Victims To Sign Up For

first_img Al OrtizReverend Simon Bautista, of Houston’s Christ Church Cathedral and a member of TMO, speaks at a press conference the group held to demand the extension of the deadline to sign up for D-SNAPMembers of The Metropolitan Organization (TMO) demanded Friday that the state of Texas requests to extend the deadline for Harvey victims to sign up for the Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Program, also known as D-SNAP, which provides funds to buy food.The deadline to sign up is this Friday, October 6th, and TMO, which is a multi-faith group, says the Texas Department of Health and Human Services should request from the federal government an extension of at least one week.TMO argues that many individuals and families from greater Houston have not had enough time to sign up because the lines at the facilities designated to do it were too long.On Friday morning, there were about 8,000 people waiting in line to sign up for D-SNAP at the George R. Brown Convention Center, in downtown Houston.“It is nothing short of a travesty,” said Deacon Sam Dunning, director of the Office of Justice and Peace at the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston and a TMO member, during a press conference held at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, near downtown Houston.The Convention Center is scheduled to close its doors at 7 p.m. this Friday, October 6th.According to preliminary data, more than 200,000 people have received D-SNAP funds so far in Harris County, the Houston Chronicle reported. Listen 00:00 /00:57 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share Xlast_img read more

Hospitals In States That Expanded Medicaid Less Likely To Close

first_img Share John Daley/CPRUp to one half of rural residents are covered by Medicaid, says Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center. And they’re typically older, poorer and sicker than city dwellers.The expansion of Medicaid helps rural hospitals stay afloat in states like Colorado, which added 400,000 people to the health insurance program under the Affordable Care Act.Hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid were about 6 times less likely to close than hospitals in non-expansion states, according to a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.The study was published Monday in the January edition of the journal Health Affairs.Colorado was one of 32 states to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. That cut the state’s uninsured rate in half. The biggest group that got coverage was childless adults.Richard Lindrooth, a professor at the Colorado School of Public Health and lead author of the study, says hospitals saw more people showing up to hospitals with that insurance — so Medicaid payments increased. That helped the hospitals’ bottom line.“It’s not as though Medicaid is an extremely profitable form of reimbursement, but it is something,” says Lindrooth, a professor the University of Colorado’s School of Public Health. “On the margins, it certainly helps the hospitals’ cash flow.”Lindrooth says he and his colleagues hypothesized that hospitals in expansion states stood a better chance of remaining financially viable. So they examined national hospital data and local market conditions.They compared four years before the Affordable Care Act went into effect (2008-2012) with years right after the launch of the ACA (2015-2016). Lindrooth says the results were noteworthy, especially for rural hospitals, which often struggle to stay open.“Rural hospitals tend to be in more of a financially tenuous position, even prior to the Medicaid expansions,” Lindrooth says. “We found that really about half of the closures that did occur in non-expansion states could have been averted through the expansion.”With more insured people in expansion states, hospitals made more money and provided less free care. “So overall their margins improved,” he says. Rural hospitals in non-expansion states didn’t have that advantage.Rural health leaders said the study confirmed what they’ve seen on the ground.Jason Cleckler, CEO of Delta Memorial Hospital in Delta, Colo., in the rural western part of the state, said the Medicaid expansion helped his hospital’s finances. He compared the numbers in 2011 with 2016, after expansion. The hospital’s Medicaid population grew from 10 percent to 20 percent, and the hospital was left with less uncompensated care. It saved the hospital more than $3 million.John Daley/CPRJason Cleckler, CEO of Delta Memorial Hospital in Delta, Colo., says Medicaid expansion helped the hospital’s bottom line.“I think that really speaks to what the researchers found. So Medicaid doubled, our bad debt decreased significantly, and the uninsured rate decreased significantly,” Cleckler says. “It’s pretty remarkable, and I would venture to say that most hospitals, even ones with a lower percentage of Medicaid, have experienced a similar story.”Cleckler did describe Medicaid coverage as a “mixed bag” for rural providers. Reimbursement rates can be paltry, he says. A hospital that pays $100 for a lab test may only be reimbursed $20. Another problem, he said, is many doctors and providers either won’t accept or limit the number of Medicaid patients due to low reimbursement rates.An average of 30 percent to 50 percent of rural patients are covered by Medicaid, noted Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center, which offers rural health providers education and training. Mills says the population in rural areas is generally “older, sicker and poorer” than in urban communities.She says the expansion plus a bump in Medicaid reimbursement rates “has helped rural Colorado hospitals from closing.” The jobs generated by those hospitals are key to rural economies, with health care one of the top three rural employers in Colorado.“The importance of Medicaid expansion in our state cannot be understated,” says Cara Welch, director of communications with the Colorado Hospital Association.Welch says other factors also provided a boost, including the state’s strong economy and its hospital provider fee. That fee helps reimburse hospitals for uncompensated care from the indigent population and those paying with Medicaid.Brock Slabach, senior vice president of the National Rural Health Association, says the study correlates with data the group has reviewed. “If state legislatures and Congress want to cure the rural hospital closure problem, expanding Medicaid and not block-granting this important program would be the answer,” he says.Members of the Republican majority in Congress have suggested changing Medicaid to a block grant. That means that instead of the federal and state governments sharing payment for every enrollee who qualifies, the federal government would provide each state a set amount of money, capping total Medicaid spending. It would let states decide how to spend the money. But health care and hospital advocates worry that the change would likely lead to cuts over time.This story is part of a reporting partnership with NPR, Colorado Public Radio and Kaiser Health News.Copyright 2018 CPR News. To see more, visit CPR News.last_img read more

Judge Allows 22 DACA Recipients To Be Defendants In Lawsuit Filed By

first_img Share Pablo Martinez Monsivais/APSupporters of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), demonstrate on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 3, 2017.The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) announced Tuesday that federal judge Andrew Hanen has allowed 22 recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) to be defendants in the lawsuit the Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton filed this month with the goal of ending the Obama-era program.Through MALDEF, the 22 DACA recipients had filed what is called a motion for intervention so that they could be defendants. Their argument was that, given the opposition the Trump Administration has against DACA, the federal government officials who are listed as defendants wouldn’t represent them adequately.The Trump Administration announced in September 2017 its intention to end DACA, but now the problem is the subject of ongoing litigation.Since it was created in the summer of 2012, DACA has protected from deportation hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as minors.Thomas Saenz, MALDEF’s president and general counsel, commented in a news release about the authorization granted by Judge Hanen, who works in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas.For Saenz, the fact that the 22 DACA recipients are able to intervene in the litigation as defendants “ensures that this case will not go forward as a sweetheart arrangement between non-adversaries who agree with each other on almost every relevant issue.”last_img read more

Sanitation worker finds foetus in drain at Parnasree

first_imgKolkata: A sanitation worker of Kolkata Municipal Corporation found a foetus inside a drain on Monday on the Becharam Chatterjee Street in Parnasree.The local councilor and the police were immediately informed and the foetus was sent for an autopsy examination. According to local residents, sanitation workers on Monday morning opened a manhole to clean the pit. One of them saw the foetus floating on the water. Local councilor Ratna Roy Chowdhury and Parnasree police station were informed. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BosePolice sent the foetus for an autopsy examination. According to source, the foetus was terminated at an advanced stage of pregnancy and the gender of the unborn baby could not be established. The details could be ascertained after the autopsy report is examined. Police officers are trying to know if any abortion was recently carried out at nearby hospitals and nursing homes. Officers are also checking if any accidental abortion case was recently reported. Police said since the abortion was carried out at an advanced stage of pregnancy, the woman who underwent the procedure might have been under medical treatment as well. It is suspected that someone from nearby areas could have disposed the foetus to erase any possible crime evidence.last_img read more

August 28 2017Over the next several months the C

first_imgAugust 28, 2017Over the next several months, the Cosanti Foundation Construction Department will be receiving a generous donation of materials from Yavapai-Apache Sand & Rock. They will be sending materials such as gravel and aggregate to be used in several different places across site. The first shipment of materials was received August 22nd, a mix of gravel and concrete mix.A portion of the gravel was used to finish the ADA parking by the north side of the East Crescent. You can find out more about Yavapai-Apache Sand & Rock at their website here: http://www.yasr.co or on their Facebook page: www.facebook.com/yavapai.apache.sand.rock/last_img

Murdered journalist Lyra McKee shot dead in Derry

first_img Murdered journalist Lyra McKee shot dead in Derry three weeks ago by the New IRATWO Derry men have appeared in court charged with rioting in the city on the night journalist yra McKee was murdered.Christopher Gillen, 38, of Balbane Pass and Paul McIntyre, 51, of Ballymagowan Park, were remanded in custody.The city’s magistrates’ court was told that evidence against them has been obtained from mobile phone footage and a documentary filmed on the day by MTV.The court also heard police believe the two men are members of the New IRA.But a police officer told the court that detectives have no evidence that the men are part of the dissident republican group.Ms McKee, 29, was shot while observing rioting in the Creggan area on Thursday, April 18.An 18-year-old man and a 15-year-old boy, also arrested last week by detectives investigating Ms McKee’s death, were released without charge.Three people were arrested in connection with the journalist’s murder but were later released unconditionally.Rioting erupted in Creggan on Thursday, April 19 following police searches for dissident gunsTwo men remanded in custody over rioting linked to Lyra McKee murder was last modified: May 13th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags: Christopher GillenCRegganLyra McKeePaul McIntyreTwo men remanded in custody over rioting linked to Lyra McKee murder ShareTweetlast_img read more