Falcon and Winter Soldier Marvel show confirmed for Disney Plus

first_img Read Lenovo Smart Clock review See It How to watch every Marvel movie in the perfect order The Cheapskate The Walt Disney Company Falcon and Winter Solider will be teaming up on Disney Plus.The new Marvel teamup show got a quick promo Thursday during the Walt Disney Company’s 2019 Investor Day event, where the show’s logo appeared on stage. If you can’t see it in the above image, here’s a closer look.disney-plus-falcon-and-winter-solider-zoom-in The Walt Disney Company Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige confirmed the show on stage during the event. It will join several other Marvel Cinematic Universe, shows like the previously announced Loki starring Tom Hiddleston and the newly revealed WandaVision starring Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany.Falcon and the Winter Soldier will unite Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan’s characters onto a “long form” show destined for the new streaming platform. TV and Movies See at Turo 3:41 Rylo 5.8K 360 Video Camera: $250 (save $250) Marvel Disney,I’m shocked — shocked! — to learn that stores are turning Labor Day into an excuse to sell stuff. Wait — no, I’m not. As much as I respect the original intent of the holiday (which became official back in 1894), to most of us, it’s just a bonus day off — one that’s blissfully tacked onto a weekend. So, yeah, stores; go ahead, run your sales. I’m listening. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Labor Day doesn’t bring out bargains to compete with the likes of Black Friday (which will be here before you know it), but there are definitely some sales worth your time.For example:We’ve rounded up the best Labor Day mattress deals.We’ve also gathered the best Labor Day laptop deals at Best Buy.The 2019 Vizio P Series Quantum is back under $999.Be sure to check out Amazon’s roughly three dozen Labor Day deals on TVs and audio. Google Express is having a big sale as well, one that includes deals on game consoles, AirPods, iPhones, laptops and more.Below I’ve rounded up a handful of individual items I consider to be the cream of the crop, followed by a handy reference guide to other Labor Day sales. Keep in mind, of course, that products may sell out at any time, even if the sale itself is still running. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Formerly known as the Google Home Hub, Google’s Nest Hub packs a wealth of Google Assistant goodness into a 7-inch screen. At $59, this is within a buck of the best price we’ve seen. It lists for $129 and sells elsewhere in the $89-to-$99 range.This is one item of many available as part of eBay’s Labor Day Sale (which, at this writing, doesn’t specifically mention Labor Day, but that’s how it was pitched to us). $520 at HP $90 at Daily Steals via Google Express $155 at Google Express Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR $999 Chris Monroe/CNET TVs Speakers Mobile Accessories Cameras Laptops Automobiles Smart Speakers & Displays Best Buy Angela Lang/CNET DJI Osmo Action camera: $261 (save $89) See It DJI’s answer to GoPro’s action cameras is rugged little model that’s shockproof, dustproof and waterproof down to 11 meters. It normally runs $350, but this deal drops it to $261 when you apply promo code 19LABOR10 at checkout. Sarah Tew/CNET Read DJI Osmo Action preview Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Lenovo Smart Clock: $59.99 (save $20) JBL Soundgear wearable speaker: $90 (save $160) Apple AirPods with Wireless Charging Case: $155 (save $45) Comment Recently updated to include digital-photo-frame capabilities, the Lenovo Smart Clock brings Google Assistant goodness to your nightstand. It’s a little smaller than the Amazon Echo Show 5, but also a full $30 less (and tied with Prime Day pricing) during this Best Buy Labor Day sale. $999 Share your voice Sprint Lenovo 130-15AST 15.6-inch laptop: $210 (save $90) Free Echo Dot with an Insignia or Toshiba TV (save $50) Spotify and most other streaming services rely on compressed audio, which robs the listener of full fidelity. Enter Tidal, the only “major” service that delivers lossless audio — meaning at least on par with CD quality, if not better. Want to see (er, hear) the difference for yourself? Grab this excellent extended trial while you can. It’s just $6 for three months, and it’s good for up to six listeners. Turo Tags See it Apple iPhone XS See at Amazon The problem with most entry-level laptops: They come with mechanical hard drives. That makes for a mighty slow Windows experience. This Lenovo model features a 128GB solid-state drive, so it should be pretty quick to boot and load software, even with its basic processor. Plus, it has a DVD-burner! That’s not something you see in many modern laptops, especially at this price. Turo: Save $30 on any car rental See It Turo is kind of like Uber meets Airbnb: You borrow someone’s car, but you do all the driving. I’ve used it many times and found it a great alternative to traditional car-rental services — in part because you get to choose exactly the vehicle you want (not just, say, “midsize”) and in part because you can often do pickup and dropoff right outside baggage claim.Between now and Sept. 1, the first 300 people to check out can get $30 off any Turo rental with promo code LDW30. Rylo $59 at eBay What’s cooler: A snapshot of a firework exploding in front of you, or full 360-degree video of all the fireworks and all the reactions to seeing them? Oooh, ahhh, indeed. At $250, the compact Rylo dual-lens camera is selling for its lowest price yet. And for an extra $50, you can get the bundle that includes the waterproof housing.This deal runs through Sept. 3; it usually costs $500. $299 at Amazon Read the Rylo camera preview Now playing: Watch this: Tidal 3-month family subscription: $5.99 (save $54) $6 at Tidal $999 Other Labor Day sales you should check out Best Buy: In addition to some pretty solid MacBook deals that have been running for about a week already, Best Buy is offering up to 40% off major appliances like washers, dryers and stoves. There are also gift cards available with the purchase of select appliances. See it at Best BuyDell: Through Aug. 28, Dell is offering an extra 12% off various laptops, desktops and electronics. And check back starting Aug. 29 for a big batch of Labor Day doorbusters. See it at DellGlassesUSA: Aug. 29 – Sept. 3 only, you can save 65% on all frames with promo code labor65. See it at GlassesUSALenovo: The tech company is offering a large assortment of deals and doorbusters through Labor Day, with the promise of up to 56% off certain items — including, at this writing, the IdeaPad 730S laptop for $700 (save $300).See it at LenovoLensabl: Want to keep the frames you already love and paid for? Lensabl lets you mail them in for new lenses, based on your prescription. From now through Sept. 2 only, you can save 20% on the blue light-blocking lens option with promo code BLOCKBLUE. See it at LensablSears: Between now and Sept. 7, you can save up to 40% on appliances (plus an additional 10% if you shop online), up to 60% on mattresses, up to 50% on Craftsman products and more. The store is also offering some fairly hefty cashback bonuses. See it at SearsNote: This post was published previously and is continuously updated with new information.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page, and find more great buys on the CNET Deals page. Boost Mobile $60 at Best Buy Tags Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Read Google Home Hub review Read the AirPods review 7 Though not technically a Labor Day sale, it’s happening during Labor Day sale season — and it’s too good not to share. Nationwide Distributors, via Google Express, has just about the best AirPods deal we’ve seen (when you apply promo code ZBEDWZ at checkout). This is for the second-gen AirPods with the wireless charging case. Can’t imagine these will last long at this price, so if you’re interested, act fast. I thought this might be a mistake, but, no, the weirdly named HP Laptop 15t Value is indeed quite the value at this price. Specs include an Intel Core i7 processor, 12GB of RAM, a 256GB solid-state drive and a 15.6-inch display. However, I strongly recommend paying an extra $50 to upgrade that display to FHD (1,920×1,080), because you’re not likely to be happy with the native 1,366×768 resolution. Sarah Tew/CNET HP Laptop 15t Value: $520 (save $780) $261 at Daily Steals via Google Express CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $210 at Best Buy An Echo Dot makes a fine match for any Fire edition TV, because you can use the latter to say things like, “Alexa, turn on the TV.” Right now, the 24-inch Insignia Fire TV Edition starts at just $100, while the 32-inch Toshiba Fire TV Editions is on sale for $130. Just add any Fire TV Edition to your cart, then add a third-gen Echo Dot, and presto: The latter is free. Share your voice Amazon 1 Google Nest Hub: $59 (save $70) Comments $999 Sarah Tew/CNET Use promo code 19LABOR10 to get an unusually good deal on JBL’s interesting hybrid product — not quite headphones, and not quite a traditional speaker, but something you wear like neckphones to listen to music on the go. Sarah Tew/CNETlast_img read more

Judge Allows 22 DACA Recipients To Be Defendants In Lawsuit Filed By

first_img Share Pablo Martinez Monsivais/APSupporters of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), demonstrate on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 3, 2017.The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) announced Tuesday that federal judge Andrew Hanen has allowed 22 recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) to be defendants in the lawsuit the Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton filed this month with the goal of ending the Obama-era program.Through MALDEF, the 22 DACA recipients had filed what is called a motion for intervention so that they could be defendants. Their argument was that, given the opposition the Trump Administration has against DACA, the federal government officials who are listed as defendants wouldn’t represent them adequately.The Trump Administration announced in September 2017 its intention to end DACA, but now the problem is the subject of ongoing litigation.Since it was created in the summer of 2012, DACA has protected from deportation hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as minors.Thomas Saenz, MALDEF’s president and general counsel, commented in a news release about the authorization granted by Judge Hanen, who works in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas.For Saenz, the fact that the 22 DACA recipients are able to intervene in the litigation as defendants “ensures that this case will not go forward as a sweetheart arrangement between non-adversaries who agree with each other on almost every relevant issue.”last_img read more

33rd Dastkari Haat Crafts Bazaar opens in Delhi

first_imgHeartwarming music from Kutch, traditional balinese dance performance and reverence for crafts by the dignitaries and spectators, the opening ceremony of the 33rd edition of the annual Dastkari Haat Crafts Bazaar at Dilli Haat was all things cultural. It is on till January 15, 2019.The annual crafts bazaar at Dilli Haat by Dastkari Haat Samiti was inaugurated by Sidharto R Suryodipuro, Ambassador, Indonesia to India. Dignitaries Lalitha Kumaramangalam – former Chairperson National Commission of Women, A Kapil, Assistant Director, Development Commissioner ( Handicrafts) Ministry of Textiles, Anna Roy – Niti Aayog and Mayur Singh – Coopita, Co-ordinator of Indonesian craftspersons also graced the event with their presence. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfMarking 70 years of diplomatic relations between India and Indonesia, the ceremony also celebrated 25 years of Dilli Haat and marked the beginning of the Craft and Skill Exchange program with Indonesian artists, supported by the O/o Development Commissioner Handicrafts, Ministry of Textiles. Adding to the vibrancy was a soulful performance by Arif Rehman, a Margapati (classical balinese dance form) dancer whose performance piece narrated story of the king of jungle looking for his prey. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveMoorala Marwada, a sufi folk singer from the Janana village of the Kutch District, Gujarat enraptured everyone present in the audience. Ajay Jadeja, Aditi Jaitly, Shelly Jyoti, Sonia Bhandari, Gaurav Jai Gupta, and other industry experts also attended the event. “It is a spectacular event, an opportunity for the artisans of both skill exchange program is another process into strengthening the ties between Indian and Indonesia, and a chance to find beauty in something that is common”, shared Sidharto R Suryodipuro, Ambassador, Indonesia to India. “It was a beautiful ceremony and the annual bazaar this year is a little more special as Dilli Haat completes 25 years. This year we have started the yellow ribbon campaign as well that helps the spectators in identifying the authentic craftsmen at Dilli Haat who are a part of our bazaar. I am really overwhelmed with the response from the visitors and the design innovation that the artisans have brought forth”, shares Jaya Jaitly, President at Dastkari Haat Samiti.last_img read more

The TV industry must adopt common standards for co

first_imgThe TV industry must adopt common standards for connected TVs or risk these devices becoming a failure, warned the BBC’s general manager for on-demand, Daniel Danker.Speaking at TV Connect in London this morning, the BBC’s iPlayer boss said that connected TVs need to share commonalities, and that not doing so previously has resulted in the industry using innovation as an “excuse for delivering sloppy experiences.”Comparing the smart TV space to the auto industry, Danker said: “Just like in cars, the pedals, the steering wheel, the gear lever are all the same. For us, whether you’re watching on one make of TV or another, they should be the same.“In fact, even if you move that experience to a mobile or a tablet, some of those consistent controls should be the same. I think it’s similar for the technologies that lie beneath the surface. They also need to share common platforms, in exactly the same way that cars share chassis or engines,” he said.Dismissing the idea that such joined-up standards would hamper development in the space, he said “the car industry has not failed to innovate and the same argument applies to us,” adding that it was the audience that currently suffers.In his keynote presentation Danker tracked the adoption rates of key technologies over the last hundred years, noting that devices like the radio and colour TV shared similar adoption rates, reaching 20% of consumers five years after being introduced, 50% after 10 years and reaching 90% after 20.“If we compare the adoption of connected TV with other TV technologies over the last century, I would say it’s sure taking it’s time. That’s not a curve that we would all be proud of. My view is that connected TV shouldn’t be any less popular or less successful than colour TV has been, but we’re at a critical time in its development,” said Danker.“My aim today is convince you that if this technology, if connected TV is going to be successful, is going to play the role that these other technologies have played in our lives, we have to get together as an industry and make some changes. If we don’t, I think in terms of adoption, connected TV will become a failure.”Citing recent iPlayer stats he added that while 23% of iPlayer viewing in January 2013 came from TV platforms, nearly all of this adoption from operator services and games consoles. Smart TVs alone accounted for just 2% of views.Concluding, Danker said the TV industry needs to create an enticing experience for users in order for them to go online from their sets. “If we get this right, I think years from now a connected TV will share space with other technology greats of the previous century.”last_img read more

Murdered journalist Lyra McKee shot dead in Derry

first_img Murdered journalist Lyra McKee shot dead in Derry three weeks ago by the New IRATWO Derry men have appeared in court charged with rioting in the city on the night journalist yra McKee was murdered.Christopher Gillen, 38, of Balbane Pass and Paul McIntyre, 51, of Ballymagowan Park, were remanded in custody.The city’s magistrates’ court was told that evidence against them has been obtained from mobile phone footage and a documentary filmed on the day by MTV.The court also heard police believe the two men are members of the New IRA.But a police officer told the court that detectives have no evidence that the men are part of the dissident republican group.Ms McKee, 29, was shot while observing rioting in the Creggan area on Thursday, April 18.An 18-year-old man and a 15-year-old boy, also arrested last week by detectives investigating Ms McKee’s death, were released without charge.Three people were arrested in connection with the journalist’s murder but were later released unconditionally.Rioting erupted in Creggan on Thursday, April 19 following police searches for dissident gunsTwo men remanded in custody over rioting linked to Lyra McKee murder was last modified: May 13th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags: Christopher GillenCRegganLyra McKeePaul McIntyreTwo men remanded in custody over rioting linked to Lyra McKee murder ShareTweetlast_img read more

One in five working coal miners in central Appalac

first_imgOne in five working coal miners in central Appalachia who have worked at least 25 years now suffer from the coal miners’ disease black lung. That’s the finding from the latest study tracking an epidemic of the incurable and fatal sickness.It’s the highest rate in a quarter century and indicates that the disease continues to afflict more miners in Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia.”We haven’t seen this rate of black lung since before the early ’90s,” says Cara Halldin, an epidemiologist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and one of the authors of the study.Black lung results from the inhalation of coal and silica dust during coal mining. Lung tissue is scarred by the dust, which diminishes the ability to breathe.The study’s researchers reviewed nearly fifty years of coal miner X-rays taken as part of a national NIOSH effort to identify disease among working coal miners. They compared the last five years of X-rays with those taken earlier.In addition to the heightened rates of disease, the study found that the most severe form of disease – progressive massive fibrosis – now occurs in 5 percent of veteran miners in the region, the highest rate ever recorded.”We can think of no other industry or workplace in the United States in which this would be considered acceptable,” wrote Halldin and her colleagues in the American Journal of Public Health.The study shows that “the protections that we’ve had in place” to protect coal miners from toxic dust “have not been adequate,” says Celeste Monforton, a former federal mine safety regulator and lecturer in public health at Texas State University.”The rules themselves haven’t been adequate. The enforcement of those rules hasn’t been adequate. And the sanctions for mine operators who violate those rules are not adequate,” Monforton says.The National Mining Association (NMA), the industry’s biggest lobbying group, calls the study’s findings “troubling.”But NMA spokeswoman Ashley Burke also notes that the study involves “miners whose exposure dates back decades before more rigorous standards were put into place.”That’s a reference to new mine dust exposure rules fully imposed by the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 2016.”One of the challenges that we face in addressing this disease is that symptoms do not typically present for more than 10 years,” Burke adds, “which means we don’t yet know if the changes made to the dust standards are making a difference.”A committee of mining experts assembled by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine recently suggested the new dust control regulations don’t measure dust exposure for enough miners in enough mine locations enough of the time.MSHA spokeswoman Amy Louviere says her agency “is reviewing the study at this time.”Virginia coal miner Jackie Yates is still working despite a diagnosis of PMF five years ago at age 44. Yates watched his brother die from the disease and recalls him struggling for every last breath before being placed on a ventilator.”I know what I’m looking at,” Yates says. “Nobody wants to die… but to go the way I saw my brother go, it don’t feel good to know how you’re going to go.”Halldin is pessimistic about what NIOSH has called an ongoing epidemic of PMF and the biggest clusters of advanced black lung ever recorded, which were identified in an NPR investigation and confirmed by NIOSH researchers.”What you see now in active miners is what you’ll see later in former miners, and potentially greater disease and more progression,” Halldin says. “And so this is probably an underestimate of what we’ll see in the future.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

A disabled peer has called on the government to ha

first_imgA disabled peer has called on the government to hand out fewer “carrots” to employers and do more to enforce existing equality law as it attempts to secure more jobs for disabled people.The plea came after Justin Tomlinson, the minister for disabled people, had been explaining the merits of the government’s Disability Confident programme in persuading organisations to employ more disabled people, which now includes organising what he calls “reverse jobs fairs”.Tomlinson was one of three ministers giving evidence to the Equality Act 2010 and disability committee, set up by the House of Lords to examine the impact of the act on disabled people over the last five years.But the disabled crossbench peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell (pictured, at the committee hearing) told Tomlinson: “I really don’t want to burst your bubble but as you were talking there I was transported back to my days at the Disability Rights Commission, where we were doing exactly the same things: we held jobs fairs, in fact it was like you were there beside me.“I trained 120 trainers to go round the country to talk to employers about being disability confident when I was working in local government 25 years ago.“What makes you think you will change people’s minds now, and don’t you think it is also time to ramp up the stick?”Baroness Campbell said that disabled people who had given evidence to the committee had made it clear that the government’s carrot-based approach “will not change things substantially”.She said: “We must enforce the law. I think that’s where they feel the government is letting them down.”She added: “I feel there are too many carrots being handed around at the moment, so where are the sticks?”Tomlinson said the government would make a substantial investment in Access to Work, and there were 339,000 more disabled people in work in the last two years, while ministers were reforming the Work Programme and Work Choice through the new work and health unit, with a white paper to be published in the new year on employment support for disabled people that was likely to include demands for “greater local flexibility”.He said: “I accept the point that there has always been business engagement. I don’t think there has been enough with the small and medium-sized employers.”When Baroness Campbell asked if enforcement of the Equality Act would be part of the white paper, Tomlinson said: “Yes.”Nicky Morgan, the education secretary and minister for women and equalities, added: “The first thing we want to do is change cultures and behaviours.“I am not always convinced that sticks and enforcement are the right way to do this. They are a necessary backstop.”last_img read more

A disabled peer has attacked Labours lazy indiff

first_imgA disabled peer has attacked Labour’s “lazy indifference” to disability equality, after it failed to back moves that would have forced bars, shops and restaurants to ensure their premises obeyed laws on accessibility when renewing their alcohol licences.Peers tried to introduce the measure as an amendment to the government’s policing and crime bill last week, but a vote on the amendment was narrowly defeated because Labour decided to abstain.The amendment was proposed by Baroness Deech, who chaired the Equality Act 2010 and disability committee, which concluded in March that there were problems in “almost every part of society” with laws designed to address disability discrimination.The disabled crossbench peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell, who sat on the committee, told Disability News Service (DNS) this week that she was “very angry” with Labour for abstaining on the vote.The amendment – backed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission and the Access Association – would have added the need to secure access for disabled people to the duties of licensing authorities.This would have meant that a pub, club, shop or restaurant that wanted a new licence or to renew their existing licence would have had to prove to their local authority that they had made reasonable efforts to make their premises accessible to disabled people.If they failed to do so, the council would have been able to refuse to grant or extend their licence.But when Baroness Deech spoke to a member of staff in the office of Labour’s chief whip on the morning of the debate, she was told that the party would abstain on a vote on her amendment.She told DNS: “I was amazed, and queried this. He said it was because of ‘strategy’ – they had to decide which issues to defeat the government on, and this was not one of them. “So their real reason was ‘strategic’, regardless of the strength of the case, even though the topic was such that one would naturally expect Labour to be supportive.”Labour peers had voted to defeat the government on another part of the bill less than two hours earlier, so there would have been no problem arranging the necessary peers to be in the Lords for the vote, she said.She added: “I am shocked and disappointed. Some of their members rebelled; a few more and we would have been home and dry.”A Labour Lords spokesman claimed that Baroness Deech had approached the whips office “very late in the day” to ask for backing for the amendment, while there had been suggestions during the day that there might be a significant government concession.He added: “Our understanding was that this [amendment] would not lead to major change.”But both Baroness Deech and Baroness Campbell dismissed these claims.Baroness Campbell said that a Labour peer, Baroness Pitkeathley, who also sat on the Equality Act and disability committee, “was up to speed on this amendment and would have briefed Labour on the importance of the vote”.She said there had been “a full debate on a very similar amendment” at the bill’s committee stage, and the amendment had subsequently been altered to “make it less costly and burdensome on the licensee”.And she said that Labour had taken part in a debate on the Deech committee report, which included a recommendation to amend licensing laws to “make a failure to comply with the Equality Act 2010 a ground for refusing a licence”.She said: “For these reasons, I am very angry with Labour for abstaining.“My annoyance stems from what I see to be a lazy indifference and lack of attention to the hard work of all sides of the House of Lords, to find ways to progress disability equality through licensing, within the constraints of our economic situation.“This was a perfect opportunity to do something practical and low-cost which would make an enormous difference.“How could Labour abstain on such a positive amendment?”Baroness Deech told fellow peers last week – Baroness Campbell had been unable to attend the debate because of ill-health – that businesses were not being asked to do anything extra through the amendment, “but simply to put their minds to accessibility”.Such a measure would help the UK to meet its duties under article nine (on accessibility) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and would “shift the burden off the shoulders of disabled people to the local authorities”, she said.The disabled Liberal Democrat peer Baroness [Celia] Thomas said: “Our lives are hard enough now without having to enforce the law too.“This is a golden opportunity to do what many organisations think should have happened years ago – to have licensing officers who are able to take action beyond [just] writing a licensee a letter or having a word in their ear.”The disabled crossbench peer Lord [Colin] Low also backed the amendment, because he said the Equality Act duty was “widely disregarded, placing the onus on the individual to enforce the duty, when enforcement is extremely difficult for the individual on account of its cost and complexity”.The government refused to back the amendment, with Home Office minister Baroness Williams warning that the cost of enforcing it would fall on businesses through increased licensing fees, and that it was “seeking to skew the regulatory regime… and use it for a purpose for which it was never intended” and “potentially puts us on to a slippery slope”.Lord Kennedy (pictured), Labour’s spokesman in the Lords on housing, communities and local government, as well as home affairs, failed to support the amendment.Instead, he suggested that the minister might argue that “there are general duties under the Equality Act 2010 in force already and that adding a specific amendment does not add anything to the statutory requirements already in force”.Peers who spoke in favour of the amendment included the disabled Tory peer Lord Shinkwin, who served on the National Disability Council that advised the Conservative government on the implementation of the 1995 Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).He told fellow peers: “I have to say that 21 years on from the DDA, I am suffering not from my disability but from a sense of déjà vu.“Despite the milestone that the act represented both for disabled people and for the Conservative party, disabled people are still waiting.“The regrettable fact is that the passage of time has not been matched by the passage of progress. The passing of this amendment would help to put that right.”He said: “I know from personal experience that the system is broken because far too many disabled people are still trying unsuccessfully to access many licensed premises.”And he added: “Accepting this amendment would enable the government to prove to disabled people that they mean what they say when they commit to building a country that works for everyone.”Labour’s failure to support the measure led to the amendment being defeated by 177 votes to 135, with only 16 Labour peers rebelling against the whip and voting in favour.last_img read more

For nine years Disability News Service has surviv

first_imgFor nine years, Disability News Service has survived largely through the support of a small number of disability organisations – most of them user-led – that have subscribed to its weekly supply of news stories. That support has been incredibly valuable but is no longer enough to keep DNS financially viable. For this reason, please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support its work and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please remember that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring, and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… Traumatised disabled people who have been restrained in mental health units have spoken of their hope that legislation approved by MPs will lead to greater protection and support for other service-users.The mental health units (use of force) bill has been guided through the House of Commons by the Labour MP Steve Reed in honour of Seni Lewis, a young man from his Croydon North constituency who died in 2010 after a prolonged period of face-down restraint at the hands of 11 police officers.  It took seven years for his parents to secure an inquest into his death, with the coroner finding last year that there had been “severe failings” by the police and mental health services, and warning of a risk of future deaths unless action was taken.Reed’s bill, which is supported by the government and covers England and Wales, still has to be debated and approved by the House of Lords but it is now likely to become law, a rarity for a private members’ bill.Once law, it would ensure that mental health units: provide proper training for staff on the use of force; introduce a policy that aims to reduce the use of force; publish information on patients’ rights; keep a record of all incidents involving the use of force by staff; and ensure all police officers entering the unit wear body cameras.The bill would also ensure deaths and serious injuries on mental health units are properly investigated, while the secretary of state for health and social care would have to publish annual statistics on the use of force by staff.Disabled campaigner Deborah King welcomed the bill’s passage through the Commons.She said: “As a teenager I was subjected to the use of force in a mental health unit.“I was frightened for my life and the experience left me vulnerable to mental illness as an adult.“We need staff to think creatively about alternatives to force. This is likely to require an increase in the numbers of mental health nurses.“Steve Reed’s new law will start to define the contours of permissible force in a mental health context. Hopefully it will lead to a reduction in the use of force.”Another disabled campaigner, who has spent time in a mental health unit and is part of the Recovery in the Bin collective, said: “I hope this will protect people like me who have been restrained from unnecessary and excessive force being used.“I hope, as well as protecting patients going forward, it will lead to greater acknowledgement and recognition that many mental health patients at their most vulnerable have been brutalised by the people who are meant to care.“I hope this will lead to better support for patients who are still traumatised by restraint (assault) experiences at the hand of the state.”She added: “I am delighted that it got through and grateful that Seni’s preventable and unnecessary death may help many future patients not to be traumatised.“And I really hope it will lead to an apology or at least acknowledgement from mental health professionals about how they’ve treated us.”She said that many examples of restraint were not even a response to violence but a result of staff forcing medication on patients, which the Mental Health Act allows staff to do even if the patient has capacity to refuse it.Reed told MPs on Friday: “Although the bill is called Seni’s Law, in honour of Seni, it has affected many people beyond Seni who have lost their lives or been injured simply because they were unwell, and the purpose of the bill is to make sure that that cannot happen again.”He had said in the bill’s second reading last November that face-down restraint had been used more than 9,000 times in the previous year, including 2,500 times against children as young as seven. And he said a disproportionate number of deaths following restraint in mental health hospitals were of black men and women.Luciana Berger, speaking for the Labour Campaign for Mental Health, said on Friday that new research by the charity Agenda showed that, between 2012-13 and 2016-17, 32 women who had been detained under the Mental Health Act had died after being restrained.last_img read more

The Rich and Powerful Warn That Robots Are Coming for Our Jobs

first_img –shares Robots Next Article Some of the richest, smartest and most powerful humans have an important message for the rest of us as they convened this week to discuss pressing global issues: the robots are coming.At the Milken Institute’s Global Conference in Beverly Hills, Calif., at least four panels so far have focused on technology taking over markets to mining — and most importantly, jobs.”Most of the benefits we see from automation is about higher quality and fewer errors, but in many cases it does reduce labor,” Michael Chui, a partner at the McKinsey Global Institute, said on Tuesday during a panel on “Is Any Job Truly Safe?”The four-day annual conference, which began on Sunday, has 3,500 invite-only participants exploring “The Future of Human Kind.”Technology has not only done away with low-wage, low-skill jobs, some of the more than 700 speakers said. They cited robots operating trucks in some Australian mines; corporate litigation software replacing employees with advanced degrees who used to sift through thousands of documents prior to trials; and on Wall Street, the automation of jobs previously done by bankers with MBAs or PhDs.”Anyone whose job is moving data from one spreadsheet to another …, that’s what is going to get automated,” said Daniel Nadler, chief executive of Kensho, a financial services analytics company partly owned by Goldman Sachs Group Inc.”Goldman Sachs will be in here in 10 years, JPMorgan will be here. They’re just going to be much more efficient in terms of operating leverage and headcount,” he added.Big banks have slashed tens of thousands of jobs in recent years as businesses like bond trading have become less profitable. Under tremendous pressure from investors to boost profits, but unable to grow revenue much, banks have increasingly turned to technology to reduce costs.A Citigroup Inc. report in March suggested that more pain is on the way for financial industry staff. Citi’s analysts predicted a 30 percent drop in banking jobs across the United States and Europe over the next decade.Milken panelists noted technology’s impact on work far beyond Wall Street.Martin Ford, an author and entrepreneur, argued that while the so-called gig economy has created temporary jobs for independent contractors, the next step is to get rid of them. The ride-hailing service Uber, for example, is investing heavily in building cars that do no need drivers, he said.David Siegel, co-chairman of the quantitative hedge fund Two Sigma, blamed technology for income problems that have led to political upheavals around the world over the past several years.”One of the big causes for the stagnation of middle class wages is essentially because of clever computer programs,” Siegel said during a panel about artificial intelligence.Some panelists were less dire in their assessments.Billionaire investor Steve Cohen said it would take awhile before robots replace stockpickers like himself. Kate Mitchell, co-founder of Scale Venture Partners, said freelance sites have allowed workers to supplement their income.”It’s easy to villainize technology,” she said, “but there is a lot of opportunity there at the same time.”(Reporting by Olivia Oran in Los Angeles; Additional reporting by Lawrence Delevingne and Michael Flaherty in Los Angeles; Writing by Lauren Tara LaCapra in New York; Editing by Richard Chang) 3 min read Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand May 4, 2016 Reuters center_img The Rich and Powerful Warn That Robots Are Coming for Our Jobs This story originally appeared on Reuters Enroll Now for $5 Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Add to Queue Image credit: Mimi Haddon | Getty Imageslast_img read more

JetBlue Defends Decision to Ask Passenger to Replace Booty Shorts Before Boarding

first_img 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List JetBlue Defends Decision to Ask Passenger to Replace Booty Shorts Before Boarding Flight. Will the Incident Affect Its Brand? –shares The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Add to Queue May 31, 2016 Apply Now » Airlinescenter_img Word to the wise, air travelers: JetBlue and booty shorts don’t mix. Maggie McMuffin found out the hard way when the airline recently asked her to slip out of her skimpy striped bottoms and into something less “offensive.”The Seattle-based burlesque performer (Maggie McMuffin is her stage name), a self-proclaimed “panty boss” and “pelvis of justice,” got her knickers in a twist, so to speak, when the airline put the odd ask to her at Logan International Airport in Boston.”The gate lead spoke to me on behalf of the flight crew and pilot,” she tells Entrepreneur. “I was approached a few minutes before boarding. It made me surprised and then angry and embarrassed.” What do you think of @JetBlue asking passenger @MaggieMcMuff to dress more “appropriately”? https://t.co/I9SaDgn228— Kim LachanceShandrow (@LaShandrow) May 31, 2016 Despite feeling disrespected by the unusual demand, and after her suggestion to tie her sweater around her waist was rejected, McMuffin acquiesced to the airline’s request. Complying on the quick to avoid missing her flight, the performer rushed to purchase a pair of $22 loose-fitting sleep trunk-style shorts at a store inside the airport. She slid them on over her “too high to fly” shorts before boarding the flight to Seattle.Related: Porn Accident: US Airways Issues Worst Brand Tweet of All TimeOnce on board, she snapped a picture of herself wearing the baggy floral replacement shorts in the airplane bathroom. She later tweeted the image out. Her tweetpic, along with selfies of her in the original short-shorts shared on KIRO7 (and now just about everywhere else online), ignited an angry backlash against JetBlue. Critics took to social media to lambaste the airline with allegations of blatant sexism. There’s even a fledgling hashtag for the backlash: #BootyShortSupport.@fuckityfuckity Yes. I was told to rebook or find something else so I bought and put on these. pic.twitter.com/RgdIkjApTD— Maggie McMuffin (@MaggieMcMuff) May 30, 2016JetBlue, for its part, tells Entrepreneur that it did not refuse to board McMuffin, only that it requested she change her bottoms. (She was also wearing matching striped thigh-highs and a long-sleeved knit sweater.)“The gate and onboard crew discussed the customer’s clothing and determined that the burlesque shorts may offend other families on the flight,” says JetBlue Airways director of corporate communications Doug McGraw. “While the customer was not denied boarding, the crewmembers politely asked if she could change. The customer agreed and continued on the flight without interruption.”Related: Shark Tank Star Daymond John Says This Is the Biggest Branding Mistake of AllCoverage coverage: Look @MaggieMcMuff! Your shorts, indecent for plane, were ok to broadcast on TVs at the airport. pic.twitter.com/QV0rbi8Yv8— Jonny Porkpie (@jonnyporkpie) May 31, 2016McGraw went on to say that JetBlue stands by its decision to ask McMuffin to change and has made two gestures of “good will” to ease the situation. “We support our crewmembers’ discretion to make these difficult decisions, and we decided to reimburse the customer for the cost of the new shorts and offered a credit for future flight as a goodwill gesture.”McMuffin says JetBlue offered her a $162 flight credit and confirms that she did receive an apology from the company. “I would appreciate an apology from the pilot,” she says. “I would also like to see JetBlue be more clear with consumers in the future about expectations for them. Dress codes should not be subjective.”From a branding and customer retention standpoint, the incident won’t make so much as a dent in JetBlue’s reputation, nor its bottom line, says veteran airline industry expert Brett Snyder. “This won’t matter, there will be no impact,” the founder and president of Cranky Concierge, a Long Beach, Calif.-based air travel assistance company, tells Entrepreneur.Related: Airport Screening Made 70,000 Miss American Airlines Flights This YearHe points to a similar incident in 2007, when a Southwest Airlines flight attendant asked a passenger named Kyla Ebbert to get off of a plane bound from San Diego to Tucson because her skirt was deemed too short. Don’t recall the incident? It’s probably because “it was quickly forgotten,” Synder says. So was the time Southwest booted Daniel Podolsky from a flight for wearing a T-shirt with the F-word on it.Solidarity and #BootyShortSupport for @MaggieMcMuff @JetBlue shame on you. pic.twitter.com/1IMgLYGBak— Kelly Blackwell (@Kellilicious) May 28, 2016Passenger attire hiccups like these don’t happen often because, as Snyder says, most airlines don’t have a “cut and dry” dress code. “This is usually covered on the ‘Refusal to Transport’ section of the airline’s contract of carriage, and JetBlue has nothing specific. Kudos to Hawaiian [Airlines] for actually having one, but most airlines do not.”He says what happened to McMuffin sometimes occurs when airline employees are forced to make a judgement call at the gate. “Since it’s a subjective rule that’s enforced by gate agents and flight crews, it never gets applied uniformly. Sometimes it will be a combination of dress code and attitude.”Such might’ve been the case with McMuffin. Snyder suspects there’s a bit more to the story than the length of her short-shorts. “The person who is denied boarding always ends up initially coming off as a completely innocent participant, but it can sometimes later come out that he or she was belligerent or drunk or something else.” No matter: “The reality is that any airline has the right to refuse service, so JetBlue certainly has the right to do it.”George Hobica, founder and president of TripAdvisor subsidiary Airfarewatchdog.com, agrees with Snyder. He doesn’t think ordering McMuffin not to wear revealing shorts on a plane will tarnish JetBlue’s brand in the least. “There will be no effect at all,” he says. “However, from photos I’ve seen, [McMuffin] was no less appropriately dressed than some male passengers I’ve seen who wear skimpy gym clothes on board, like cut-off shorts, muscle T-shirts, etc.”Related: Here’s Why JetBlue Wanted New Yorkers to Steal Its Outdoor PostersBrand damage or no brand damage, Hobica says JetBlue is still eating a considerable slice of humble pie. “Well, I’ve seen guys with very skimpy gym shorts on planes — the kinds marathoners run in — and they’ve not been asked to ‘cover up,’ so I would say this is just prudery or sexism on the part of the Jetblue crew. The fact that JetBlue is apologizing, compensating and trying to make this go away suggests that corporate is embarrassed by the whole thing.”As they it should be, says McMuffin. “JetBlue is sending a message that women’s bodies are open to subjective policing on behalf of individual employees,” she says. “What they did also says that if someone is deemed wrong by a single employee, it makes them less than a customer and less than a person.” Former West Coast Editor 7 min read Image credit: Bloomberg | Getty Images Next Article Kim Lachance Shandrowlast_img read more

Study identifies patterns of chronic lymphocytic leukemia growth

first_imgOur findings provide a framework not only for understanding the differing patterns of CLL growth in patients but also for exploring the basic biological mechanisms that underlie these differences. Ultimately, we’d like to be able to tie the genotype of the disease – the particular genetic abnormalities in a patient’s cancer cells – to its phenotype, or how the cancer actually behaves,” Getz remarked.Catherine J. Wu, MD, of Dana-Farber, the Broad Institute, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the co-senior author of the study with Gad Getz, PhD, of the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)May 29 2019In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the rate of disease growth is apt to follow one of three trajectories: relentlessly upward, steadily level, or something in between, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the University of Washington report in a new study. The particular course the disease takes is tightly linked to the genetic make-up of the cancer cells, particularly the number of growth-spurring “driver” mutations they contain.The study, published online today by the journal Nature, contains a further insight: genetic changes that occur very early in CLL development exert a powerful influence on the growth pattern the CLL cells will ultimately take. This raises the possibility that physicians may one day be able to predict the course of the disease by its molecular features at the time of diagnosis. CLL is a useful model for studying the pace of cancer growth because it progresses at widely different rates from one patient to another, Wu explained. In many patients, it persists at a very low level for many years before advancing to the point where treatment is necessary. In others, it progresses so rapidly that treatment is required shortly after diagnosis.To see if there were different patterns of CLL growth among patients, researchers drew on data from 107 patients diagnosed with the disease. Beginning at diagnosis, each patient underwent periodic blood tests to track disease progress over the succeeding months and years, and continued until the disease reached a stage where treatment would begin. Each test consisted of a white blood cell count, which served as a proxy measure of CLL: the greater the number of white cells within a blood sample, the greater the burden of the disease. The tests were conducted over a period ranging from two years in one patient to 19 years in another.The serial testing allowed researchers to calculate growth rates over time for CLL in each patient. They used a statistical model to determine if the rates were consistent with various patterns of cancer growth. “We found that some cases of CLL show exponential growth, in which it expands without any apparent limit, while other cases show ‘logistic’ growth, in which it plateaus at a fairly consistent level,” said Ivana Bozic, PhD, of the University in Washington, co-lead author of the study. Cases that didn’t fit either category were classified as indeterminate.To explore whether genetic differences were at the root of these divergent growth patterns, the researchers performed whole-exome sequencing on several CLL samples collected from each patient prior to receiving therapy. (Whole-exome sequencing provides a letter-by-letter readout of the regions of DNA that are translated into cell proteins.) They found that exponentially growing CLL typically carried a large number of driver mutations – mutations that confer a competitive advantage in growth – and quickly reached the stage where treatment was called for. In contrast, logistically growing CLL had fewer genetic alterations, had fewer types of alterations, and progressed relatively slowly towards the level that requires treatment. Seventy-five percent of patients with exponential growth eventually warranted treatment; by comparison, 21% of those with logistic growth and 67% of those with indeterminate growth eventually required treatment.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on how leukemia cells become resistant to drugsResearch reveals genomic basis of acute erythroid leukemiaOverlooked part of cell’s internal machinery may hold key to treating acute myeloid leukemiaBy analyzing patients’ serial blood samples collected over a period of time, researchers found that exponential CLL not only grows faster but also evolves faster, spinning off new subtypes of cancer cells, each with a particular set of genetic abnormalities. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that exponential CLL is marked by a great variety of tumor cell types and subtypes, while logistic CLL is marked by a relatively less diverse collection of tumor cells.The information from whole-exome sequencing further enabled researchers to discover the growth rates of those subpopulations of cells within each patient’s leukemia that could be identified on the basis of a subset of mutations, some of them so-called drivers. These measurements clearly revealed that many of the mutations highly suspected as being centrally involved in CLL growth did in fact provide subpopulations containing these mutations with preferential growth acceleration as compared to populations lacking these putative drivers. These studies further indicate that the eventual course of CLL growth is inscribed in the genes of tumor cells early in the disease’s development. “If the course of the disease isn’t altered by therapeutic treatment, the rate and pattern of CLL growth over time seems to ‘play out’ according to a predetermined set of genetic instructions,” Wu remarked.”The discovery that CLL growth accelerates in the presence of large numbers of driver mutations is compelling evidence that these mutations do, in fact, confer a growth advantage to cells – that they truly do ‘drive’ the disease,” said Michaela Gruber, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber, the Broad Institute, and the Medical University of Vienna, co-lead author of the study.Joining Gruber and Bozic as co-lead authors are Ignaty Leshchiner, PhD, and Dimitri Livitz, researchers in Getz’s Cancer Genome Computational Analysis group at the Broad Institute, who together with Bozic developed methods to jointly model possible phylogenetic relationships of cancer cell populations (i.e, a description of each subpopulation’s history and relationships to each other during the evolution of the cancer) and integrate growth rates with subclone-specific genetic information. “It is important to model all probable parent-child relationships of subclones to correctly attribute differences in growth rates to driver mutations,” said Leshchiner.”Combining clinical data with computational and mathematical modeling, we show that the growth of many CLLs follows specific mathematical equations – exponential and logistic – each associated with distinct underlying genetics and clinical outcomes. Integrating tumor burden and whole-exome sequencing data allowed us to quantify the growth rates of different tumor subpopulations in individual CLLs, methodology that could potentially inform personalized therapy in the future,” summarized Bozic.Source:Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteJournal reference:Wu, C.J. et al. (2019) Growth dynamics in naturally progressing chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Nature. doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1252-x.last_img read more

Study provides evidence that ozone exposure may advance subclinical arterial disease

first_imgThis may indicate that the association between long-term exposure to ozone and cardiovascular mortality that has been observed in some studies is due to arterial injury and acceleration of atherosclerosis.”Study lead author Meng Wang, assistant professor of epidemiology and environmental health in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 30 2019Long-term exposure to ambient ozone appears to accelerate arterial conditions that progress into cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to a new University at Buffalo study.It’s the first epidemiological study to provide evidence that ozone might advance subclinical arterial disease — injuries that occur to the artery walls prior to a heart attack or stroke — and provides insight into the relationship between ozone exposure and cardiovascular disease risk. The paper was published in May in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.The longitudinal study followed nearly 7,000 people aged 45 to 84 from six U.S. regions: Winston-Salem, North Carolina; New York City; Baltimore; St. Paul, Minnesota; Chicago; and Los Angeles. Participants were enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and have been followed for over a decade.Atherosclerosis refers to the build-up of plaque, or fatty deposits, in the artery walls, which, over time, restricts blood flow through the arteries. This can cause blood clots, resulting in a heart attack or stroke, depending on which artery — coronary or carotid, respectively — the plaque accumulates in.The study found that chronic exposure to ozone was associated with a progression of thickening of the main artery that supplies blood to the head and neck. It also revealed a higher risk of carotid plaque, a later stage of arterial injury that occurs when there’s widespread plaque buildup in the intima and media, the innermost two layers of an artery wall.”We used statistical models to capture whether there are significant associations between ozone exposure and these outcomes,” said Wang, who is also a faculty member in the UB RENEW (Research and Education in eNergy, Environment and Water) Institute. “Based on this model, it suggests that there is an association between long-term exposure to ozone and progression of atherosclerosis.”While the study finds an association between air pollution and atherosclerosis, researchers aren’t clear on why. “We can show that there is an association between ozone exposure and this outcome, but the biological mechanism for this association is not well understood,” Wang said.Related StoriesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockNew method improves detection of atrial fibrillation in stroke survivorsLipid-lowering drugs are underutilized for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseaseThe study is unique in its focus on ozone exposure rather than particulate matter.Particle pollution comes from a variety of human and natural activities. Examples include vehicle exhaust, fossil fuel burning and agricultural and industrial operations and processes. Smog is a harmful byproduct of such activities.That shouldn’t be confused with the ozone layer in Earth’s upper atmosphere, which shields us from much of the sun’s ultraviolet radiation.Ground-level ozone, however, causes serious health problems. When breathed in, it aggressively attacks lung tissue by chemically reacting with it, according to the American Lung Association.Wang’s study — which includes researchers from the University of Washington and the University of Wisconsin-Madison — has policy implications for the U.S., where the Environmental Protection Agency in 2015 lowered the federal health standards for ozone.”Most attention to air quality in the United States has focused on particulate matter air pollution,” Wang said. “However, ozone concentrations within metropolitan areas are not positively correlated with particulate matter pollution. In addition, mean ozone levels — as reported in this paper — are not declining in the United States, probably due to the worsening of climate change.”The EPA reports that particulate matter concentrations have decreased across the nation as efforts are made to reduce vehicle emissions and use clean energy.Ozone, however, is much trickier, Wang notes. “For policy in the U.S., the focus should be on how to effectively control ozone concentration, which may be harder because it’s a secondary pollutant,” he said. “With climate change getting worse, this issue may become amplified.”Source:University at BuffaloJournal reference:Wang, M. et al. (2019) Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Ozone and Progression of Subclinical Arterial Disease: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution. Environmental Health Perspectives. doi.org/10.1289/EHP3325.last_img read more