Go back to the enewsletter United Airlines will

first_imgGo back to the e-newsletter >United Airlines will unveil new United Club lounges in both Atlanta and San Francisco, offering customers comfortable seating, fresh and healthy food choices, complimentary beverages and plentiful power outlets throughout.“Our customers deserve the very best travel experience, and our new clubs are not only beautiful spaces, they are also very functional and will provide the perfect settings for customers to relax, refresh and recharge before their flights,” said Jimmy Samartzis, United’s vice president of food services and United Clubs. “We are investing over $100 million in our United Club locations over the next few years to offer customers the added comfort and convenience they expect during their trips.”The nearly 465sqm Atlanta United Club features panoramic views of the airport as well as seating for more than 100 people, giving travellers a comfortable and convenient airport getaway where they can unwind during their journeys. The modern design also features vintage aviation artwork throughout the club, and visiting customers may dine on complimentary fresh food choices, including yoghurt and fresh fruit; sliced red bell peppers with hummus; rotating seasonal soups; and spicy Bloody Mary trail mix. The Atlanta club is located between gates 11 and 12 at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport’s Concourse T, on the mezzanine level.At just over 557sqm, the newest United Club at San Francisco International Airport will first welcome travellers on 18 November. The club will offer a bird’s-eye view of airport operations and a gallery of photos of United’s history. Comfortable seating can accommodate more than 130 people who will be able to enjoy a complimentary menu with seasonal choices, such as fresh zucchini, yellow squash and cherry tomatoes; butternut squash soup; dressed spinach salad; and a variety of fresh meats and cheeses. The club is located in the newly renovated Terminal 3 East Concourse, scheduled to open the same day, and will operate in addition to United Club locations in Terminal 3’s Concourse F and in the airport’s International Terminal G.Like remodelled United Club locations in Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, Seattle, Boston and London, the new San Francisco location will offer additional work stations and abundant power outlets for customers to work with greater ease and comfort. Members may also enjoy complimentary beverages and Wi-Fi, as well as premium wines and spirits.United Club InvestmentOver the next three years, United plans to renovate and update United Club locations throughout its network. Starting in 2016, the airline will begin extensive renovations at locations including New York/Newark, Chicago O’Hare, Los Angeles, Fort Lauderdale, Dallas-Fort Worth and Guam.Go back to the e-newsletter >last_img read more

Dogs can read human emotions

first_imgDog owners often say they “know” that their dog understands what they’re feeling. Now, scientists have the evidence to back this up. Researchers tested 17 adult dogs of various breeds to see whether they could recognize emotional expressions in the faces and voices of humans and other dogs—an ability that’s considered a higher cognitive talent because two different senses are involved. Each dog took part in two test sessions with 10 trials. One by one, they stood facing two screens on which the researchers projected photos of unfamiliar but happy/playful human or dog faces versus the same faces with angry/aggressive expressions (as in the photo above). At the same time, the scientists played a single vocalization—either a dog bark, or an unfamiliar human speaking in Portuguese, a language none of the dogs had previously heard, or a neutral sound. The dogs looked much longer at a face (dog or human) when the expression matched the tone of the voice, a measure that’s also been used to assess various cognitive abilities of other mammals, the scientists report online today in Biology Letters. The dogs were best at this when looking at a fellow dog, which supports another study showing that dogs preferred looking at images of other dogs rather than those of humans. It’s the first time that a species, other than humans, has been shown to be capable of interpreting the vocal and facial expressions of an entirely different species of animal—a talent that surely helps Fido survive in its ecological niche: the jungle of the human home.last_img read more