Climate change resulting in shift to green economies says UN agency

20 February 2008More and more companies are embracing environmentally-friendly policies and investors are pumping hundreds of billions of dollars into cleaner and renewable energies, according to a new publication released today by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). More and more companies are embracing environmentally-friendly policies and investors are pumping hundreds of billions of dollars into cleaner and renewable energies, according to a new publication released today by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). While the impacts of climate change range from the melting of permafrost and glaciers to extreme weather events, UNEP’s Year Book 2008 shows that it is also causing a shift in the mind-sets, policies and actions of leaders of governments, companies and the UN itself. “Increasingly, combating climate change is being perceived as an opportunity rather than a burden and a path to a new kind of prosperity as opposed to a brake on profits and employment,” according to the new report. The emerging ‘green’ economy is also credited with driving invention and innovation on a scale not seen since perhaps the industrial revolution. The Year Book was presented today in Monaco at the opening of the largest gathering of environment ministers since the landmark UN Climate Change Conference in Indonesia last December which ended with nearly 200 countries agreeing in Bali to launch a two-year process of formal negotiations to tackle the problem of global warming. UNEP’s Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum, which is focusing on the theme “Mobilizing Finance for the Climate Challenge,” brings together ministers as well as representatives of business, organized labour, science and civil society. “Hundreds of billions of dollars are now flowing into renewable and clean energy technologies and trillions more dollars are waiting in the wings looking to governments for a new and decisive climate regime post 2012 alongside the creative market mechanisms necessary to achieve this,” UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner told the Forum. “Formidable hurdles remain as to whether these funds will ultimately seek out new, climate-friendly investments for the future or whether they will seek the lowest common denominator by flowing into the polluting technologies of the past,” he said. He added that “designing an attractive, creative and equitable investment landscape which rewards those willing to invest in tomorrow’s economy today is the challenge before ministers here in Monaco and the challenge for the international community over the next two years.” Despite a great deal of activity, the Year Book notes that many challenges remain to truly embed new and innovative ideas in the global economy in the years to come. Subsidies favouring fossil fuels over cleaner energies and tariff and trade regimes that make cleaner technologies more expensive are just some of the barriers that need to be overcome. read more

Greater efforts must be made to realize every persons right to food

5 March 2009With the number of hungry people around the world surging amid the current global financial crisis and the effects of climate change, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today stressed the need to scale-up efforts to combat hunger and realize every person’s right to food. With the number of hungry people around the world surging amid the current global financial crisis and the effects of climate change, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today stressed the need to scale-up efforts to combat hunger and realize every person’s right to food.“Food is not just a commodity, and agriculture is not just a business. Both are central to survival. Realizing every person’s right to food is a moral and humanitarian imperative,” Mr. Ban told students of the UN International School at a conference on the global food crisis.The Secretary-General said that the way the world grows, markets and trades food does not protect the poor, and the situation is getting worse. “Between global warming and the financial crisis, the number of hungry people is surging.”Last year saw an unprecedented movement of farmers, community groups, businesses, governments, the UN and development organizations working together to tackle the food crisis, in what Mr. Ban described as “the largest emergency scale-up against hunger and malnutrition in history.”Donors have pledged more aid, and the international community has held a series of emergency meetings, but the main work is in communities and countries, he noted. “That is where we are using food assistance and giving seeds and fertilizers to farmers. That is where we are helping communities adapt to climate change and building roads and storage centres so that produce can get to market.”Nevertheless, the global community needs to do even more this year, Mr. Ban stated. The UN is moving on two fronts: delivering immediate food and nutrition assistance, and improving longer-term food production and agricultural development. In addition, it is pushing for a fairer world trade system that works for poor people while combating climate change.The way out of the crisis, he noted, is to tackle the urgent challenges while fixing the underlying problem. “Hunger is a stain on humanity,” he asserted. “The time has come to remove that stain – forever.” read more

Nepal UNESCO condemns attacks against journalists covering protests

10 May 2010The United Nations agency tasked with upholding press freedom today spoke out against the intimidations and attacks yesterday against journalists covering Maoist protests in the Nepalese capital, Kathmandu. Following peaceful May Day demonstrations, the Maoists called for an extended strike, or “bandh,” amid a political stand-off with the Government.According to media reports, the strike was called off last Friday, but Maoist protestors gathered yesterday in Singha Durbar, the administrative hub of the capital.The UN Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) office in Kathmandu today condemned intimidations and attacks against journalists covering the demonstrations in Singha Durbar.“These attacks violate the fundamental rights of media professionals” reporting on yesterday’s events, the agency said in a press release. “But they also attack the right of everyone to receive a diversity of information and ideas.”Under no circumstances, UNESCO underscored, should journalists’ efforts to contribute to Nepal’s peace process through their reporting be obstructed.The agency said it is particularly concerned about the attacks, as they occurred just days after World Press Freedom Day was celebrated on 3 May.A decade-long civil war in Nepal that claimed some 13,000 lives ended with the signing of a peace accord between the Government and the Maoists in 2006.After conducting Constituent Assembly elections in May 2008, the country abolished its 240-year-old monarchy and declared itself a republic. But the peace process has stalled recently, threatened by tensions and mistrust between Maoists, the Government and the army.Karin Landgren, the Secretary-General’s Representative and head of the UN Mission in Nepal (UNMIN), warned the Security Council last week of “grave risks” the strike posed to the peace process.“Nepal’s peace process is at a delicate and critical moment, as negotiators work to resolve the current stand-off between Maoist supporters and the Government, primarily over Maoist demands for a national unity government.” read more

SLBC Director killed in accident

According to the police the SLBC van was headed to Jaffna when the accident took place at Rambewa in Anuradhapura. A Director of the Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation (SLBC) was killed and six others were injured following an accident in Anuradhapura this morning.The police said that the van in which the SLBC employees were travelling collided with a lorry killing SLBC Director Nurania Hassan.

Former Maldivian President asserts Sri Lanka is a trusted friend

Riyaz previously accused Sri Lanka of harbouring “coup plotters” in September last year after government officials told reporters it has no concerns with the activities of former president Mohamed Nasheed. Nasheed regularly visits Colombo to meet with other opposition figures in exile. The opposition leader was controversially jailed on terrorism charges in early 2015 but was granted medical leave in a deal brokered by Sri Lanka, India, the UK and US. (Colombo Gazette) Former Maldivian President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom asserted Sri Lanka is a close and trusted friend of the Maldives.His comments came after Maldives Parliamentarian Riyaz Rasheed accused Sri Lanka of assisting alleged opposition efforts to overthrow the Maldivian Government. “Sri Lanka has always been a very close and highly trusted friend of Maldives. No one has the right to disturb our bilateral relations,” Gayoom tweeted. read more

Threat from AlQaida and Taliban constantly evolving Security Council told

In an open briefing to the Council, Ambassador Heraldo Muñoz of Chile, Chairman of the sanctions committee, said while it was wrong to suggest that the sanctions approach to terrorist groups had failed, the response could be more effective by being both vigilant and flexible.”The nature of the threat is constantly evolving, just as Al-Qaida itself has evolved from an organization with a structure and hierarchy into a global network of groups unbound by organizational structure but held together by a set of overlapping ideological goals,” he said.Mr. Muñoz said closer cooperation between States on operational issues was one example of how it could be much more difficult for terrorist groups to carry out their work.He also called on States to submit fresh names to the Committee’s list of individuals and entities belonging to, or associated with, Al-Qaida and the Taliban. Currently 429 names, or “only a small fraction of the actual number,” appear on the list, he said.”I understand that there can be many reasons for not submitting names to the Committee, including concerns regarding due process, delisting and potential stigmatization. I strongly believe, however, that Member States and the Committee can resolve such concerns together.”Improving the quality of the list was a priority for the Committee, he added.Mr. Muñoz said he was also encouraged that the monitoring team, which examines what steps individual States have taken to comply with the relevant resolutions against the Taliban and Al-Qaida, has observed stronger interest from many nations in helping the Committee with its work.The Council first imposed sanctions after the indictment of Usama bin Laden for the 1998 terrorist bombings of United States embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania, which left hundreds of people dead. read more

UN rushes food medical supplies to survivors of Russian school attack

In response to requests from Russian doctors, the World Food Programme (WFP) on Monday begun an initial one-week food distribution to three hospitals in Beslan and the North Ossetian regional capital of Vladikavkaz, where many victims were taken. “What happened in Beslan is a terrible tragedy. WFP is determined to do all it can to alleviate the suffering of the victims,” WFP Country Director Chris Czerwinski said today. WFP’s ability to respond quickly to the crisis was partly due to the agency’s existing capacity in the north Caucasus region of southern Russia, where it has been providing emergency assistance since January 2000 to 290,000 people affected by the conflict in and around Chechnya. The WFP relief packages include sugar, flour, rice, yoghurt, milk, pasta, condensed milk, dried fruits and jam. For its part the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has sent 12 tons of medical and other supplies, including bandages, syringes, bed linens, mattresses, hospital beds and catheters to treat the hundreds of children injured in the school siege. read more

Baloney Meter Will carbon tax siphon 25 billion from Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall arrives for a meeting of Premiers in Whitehorse, Yukon, Friday, July, 22, 2016. It seemed to come as a surprise to everyone: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau telling the House of Commons that Ottawa will set a minimum price for carbon pollution, forcing the hand of any province or territory that’s not doing it themselves. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward OTTAWA – “The carbon tax will siphon over $2.5 billion from Saskatchewan’s economy when fully implemented and make our province a less competitive place to do business.” — Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall, responding to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s announcement Monday of a “floor price” on carbon.—It seemed to come as a surprise to everyone: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau telling the House of Commons that Ottawa will set a minimum price for carbon pollution, forcing the hand of any province or territory that’s not doing it themselves.Trudeau’s plan — a “floor price” of $10 per tonne starting in 2018, increasing to $50 per tonne by 2022 — didn’t sit well with Saskatchewan’s Brad Wall, a longtime opponent of pricing carbon.Such a “carbon tax” would have disastrous effects on resource-dependent Saskatchewan, Wall complained. His assertion that the measure would “siphon” more than $2.5 billion out of the province is now being repeated by Conservative MPs.But is it true? Will Saskatchewan lose billions of dollars and suffer economically if the federal government sets a carbon price of $50 a tonne?Spoiler alert: The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney” (complete methodology below).This one earns a rating of “a lot of baloney” — the statement is mostly inaccurate, but contains elements of truth. Here’s why.THE FACTSA carbon tax generally takes the form of an extra charge on fossil fuels such as gasoline, natural gas and coal. It is one way governments try to encourage companies and consumers to be more energy efficient, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and spark more investment in renewable energy sources.In 2008, British Columbia became the first Canadian jurisdiction to widely implement a carbon tax — currently $30 per tonne. An Environment Canada backgrounder on Trudeau’s new policy states that, “at a minimum, carbon pricing should apply to substantively the same sources as British Columbia’s carbon tax.”In real terms, British Columbians pay an extra 6.67 cents per litre of gasoline as a result of the carbon tax. Other fuels such as diesel, natural gas, propane and coal are taxed at different rates because of their different emissions.The B.C. government says about 70 per cent of its annual greenhouse gas emissions come from fuels that are taxed, which last year generated about $1.2 billion in revenue. The rest is either from non-energy sources such as farm animals and deforestation, or “fugitive” emissions that can’t be measured.Wall’s office declined to provide numbers to back up his statement.However, Saskatchewan’s environment ministry says the province generated 74.8 million tonnes of greenhouse gases in 2013. Assuming 70 per cent would be taxed at $50 per tonne, that equates to $2.6 billion per year — well within Wall’s $2.5 billion ballpark.But central to Trudeau’s announcement was the promise that any and all revenue generated by a federally imposed price would flow back to the province or territory from which it came — a direct contradiction of Wall’s Saskatchewan “siphon.”In terms of competitiveness, a B.C. government study in 2012 found a $30 per tonne carbon tax had a small negative impact on economic growth. Some industries, such as agriculture, were hit harder and thus required more tax relief, the study found. Clearly, a price higher than $30 per tonne would have a deeper impact.Kathy Young, a spokesperson for Wall, said in an email that Saskatchewan’s analysis of the impact includes fuel, fertilizer, and other “key aspects” of Saskatchewan’s economy.“According to federal government data, these sectors represent 66 per cent of Saskatchewan’s emissions profile,” Young wrote. “British Columbia’s greenhouse-gas emissions (70 per cent) primarily come from transportation.”Young also noted that even in the case of a revenue-neutral plan, the administration of a carbon tax is likely to have an impact.“Removing money from the hands of consumers and business, and redirecting it through government mechanisms, undermines the efficient allocation of resources within the economy.”A tax in Saskatchewan would also put the province at a “significant competitive disadvantage” to other jurisdictions with which it competes economically, she added.For the record, the Alberta government has promised to release its own economic analysis in advance of implementing a carbon tax in January, although no such analysis has yet to materialize.WHAT THE EXPERTS SAYWall’s estimate that a carbon tax would generate about $2.5 billion in Saskatchewan appears correct, experts say. It would also impact competitiveness, although the magnitude would depend on the sector.But given the Liberal government’s promise to return all carbon revenue to the original province or territory, they note that any notion that billions would be “siphoned” out of Saskatchewan is clearly untrue.“Concretely, it would be a transfer from the federal to the provincial government of that amount, which the provincial government could then do what it wishes with it,” said Trevor Tombe, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Calgary.“In that sense, it is incorrect to say the funds are siphoned out of Saskatchewan.”Nicholas Rivers, an associate professor at the University of Ottawa’s Institute of the Environment, said the real cost to people and businesses in Saskatchewan will depend on what the provincial government does with the money.“The Saskatchewan government, if it chooses, can give the entire amount of revenue raised by the tax back to Saskatchewan residents, in whatever form it chooses,” Rivers said in an email.That could include tax rebates, tax cuts or support for industries such as heavy manufacturing or agriculture that face a disproportionate impact from a carbon tax.Mark Cameron is a former policy director in the office of then-prime minister Stephen Harper who now heads up the environmental research group Canadians for Clean Prosperity. He said a carbon tax could actually end up costing less than Wall’s preferred emissions-reducing options.Wall has championed carbon capture sequestration — trapping underground the carbon dioxide generated by power plants and other sources — as well as a plan to have half of Saskatchewan’s energy come from renewable sources such as solar and wind by 2030.“I think Premier Wall has indicated he doesn’t want a carbon price, but he hasn’t really given a persuasive, rational explanation as to why a carbon price is worse than the other actions he’s committed to take,” Cameron said.“Those are very costly policies. A carbon price would achieve the same objectives at lower cost.”THE VERDICTA carbon tax of $50 per tonne would indeed generate more than $2.5 billion in Saskatchewan. It would also have an impact on the province’s economy and competitiveness, though how much is a matter for debate.But Wall’s central warning — taxpayers and businesses would see billions leave Saskatchewan because of Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax — is false, given the federal promise to keep provinces and territories whole.For those reasons, Wall’s statement contains “a lot of baloney.”METHODOLOGYThe Baloney Meter is a project of The Canadian Press that examines the level of accuracy in statements made by politicians. Each claim is researched and assigned a rating based on the following scale:No baloney — the statement is completely accurateA little baloney — the statement is mostly accurate but more information is requiredSome baloney — the statement is partly accurate but important details are missingA lot of baloney — the statement is mostly inaccurate but contains elements of truthFull of baloney — the statement is completely inaccurate by Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press Posted Oct 6, 2016 5:30 am MDT Last Updated Oct 6, 2016 at 5:27 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Baloney Meter: Will carbon tax ‘siphon’ $2.5 billion from Saskatchewan? read more

Founder of global ErasingHate movement to speak at Brock

For many years, Brock alumnus Corey Fleischer (BA ’06) struggled to determine what he wanted to do with his life.But all that changed one fateful day on his way to a power-washing job in the suburbs of Montreal.The #ErasingHate movement has been gaining traction around the world.“I was sitting in my truck at a red light when I noticed a swastika spray painted on a cinder block,” Fleischer recalled. “I had all the tools necessary to remove the graffiti, but I didn’t. I just went to my job. The second I drove by it I knew I was doing something wrong and that I made a mistake.”An hour into the job, unable to silence the nagging voice in his head, Fleischer dropped everything. He sent his employees home and drove back to the vandalized intersection to remove the graffiti with his power washer.“My quest for a deeper meaning in life has led me to take action and turn a pastime into a life mission,” Fleischer said. “The 15 seconds it took to remove that swastika was the feeling I had been looking for my whole life.”He channelled that energy into the creation of #ErasingHate, which targets and eliminates hate graffiti anywhere in the world for free. The movement has grown considerably online and around the globe since its inception.“I erased 50 instances of hate graffiti in the first five years and now #ErasingHate removes 50 pieces a day,” Fleischer said. “This isn’t just a movement, it’s my life’s mission.”Brock alumnus Corey Fleischer (BA ’06) is President and Founder of the global #ErasingHate movement that targets and eliminates hate graffiti anywhere in the world for free.Fleischer was first introduced to the power-washing industry through his roommate at Brock University, where he completed his Bachelor of Arts degree and spent three years on the men’s hockey team. He described himself as the protector of his teammates, a role that now manifests in his quest to end the cycle of hate around the world.For the first time in more than 10 years Fleischer will return to Brock’s main campus on Tuesday, March 19 to present a talk about his journey creating the global #ErasingHate movement.The presentation will be hosted in Isaac’s by the Brock University Alumni Association (BUAA) and Brock University Students’ Union from 5:30 to 7 p.m. The event will feature a complimentary dinner sponsored by the BUAA and is open to all members of the Brock community. Registration is required through Eventbrite.Fleischer is the 2018 recipient of the BUAA’s Community Engagement Award, which recognizes a Brock graduate who has made outstanding contributions to their community and in doing so, has enriched the lives of others. The award honours one extraordinary graduate who has made a significant contribution as a volunteer to their community. read more

Funny faces of drowsy pets captured during and after surgery

first_imgA Jack Russell is prepared for a surgical procedureCredit:Getty  A pet is prepared for a surgical procedureCredit:Getty  kitten  Last month, a photo capturing the tender moment a dying cat ‘held its owner’s hand’ on a final trip to vet when viral. There is also a new dedicated dental suite to care for the 80 per cent of animals who arrive at the home with problem teeth. terrier  Claire Horton, Chief Executive of Battersea, said: “For 156 years Battersea has been on the front line of animal care, caring for the many thousands of abandoned and neglected dogs and cats who come through our gates who so desperately need our help. Veterinary staff prepare to sedate an Akita dogCredit:Getty  Brand new intensive care areas and sound-proofed recovery wards with separate space for dogs and cats will allow for a ‘peaceful and calm recovery’. A kitten is prepared for surgeryCredit:Getty  Veterinary staff fit a breathing tube to an Akita dog A dog is prepared for surgery Credit:Getty  dog A Jack Russell is prepared for a surgical procedure The Duchess of Cornwall, who has two Battersea dogs, was there to officially open the charity’s new hospital last month. A Staffordshire Bull Terrier undergoes surgery The terrier after surgery Credit:Getty  Senior Theatre Nurse Rebecca Smith carries out a procedure on a cat  Veterinary staff prepare to sedate an Akita dog Veterinary staff fit a breathing tube to an Akita dogCredit:Getty  The new Veterinary Hospital, which opened on September 7, has three operating theatres, enabling staff to perform over 100 operations per week. “Our new Veterinary Hospital and Centre of Excellence will help us realise our ambition to help more dogs and cats and not just those within our centres, as this world-leading facility will enable us to welcome and train staff from rescue and rehoming organisations all over the world. Senior Theatre Nurse Rebecca Smith carries out a procedure on a cat Credit:Getty  A kitten is prepared for surgery “The new Veterinary Hospital is a place of transformation and hope where even the most neglected and abused dogs and cats can be put back on four paws by our dedicated staff before they are found a new loving home. We look forward to an exciting future working to transform the wellbeing of dogs and cats across the UK and beyond.” These pet photos capture what cats and dogs go through before, during and after surgery at Battersea Dogs & Cats Home. A Jack Russell is prepared for a surgical procedure Shaun Opperman, Battersea’s Veterinary Director for the last 24 years, added: “Our new facilities will speed up treatment and recovery to give each and every rescue dog and cat a chance of a new life as quickly as possible.” A kitten at the animal hospital Credit:Getty  A Staffordshire Bull Terrier undergoes surgeryCredit:Getty  Meanwhile, here’s the touching moment girl says final goodbye to her dying pet dog.  From a Staffordshire Bull Terrier recovering from an operation to a tiny kitten being prepared for surgery, the images show an average day at the new Veterinary Hospital and Centre of Excellence Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Miners body lobbying Govt to review tax system

The Guyana Gold and Diamond Miners Association (GGDMA) has made an appeal for the Government to review the current tax system involving miners with the hope that this could somehow be restructured thereby lessening the financial burden on all miners, whether small or large.This is not something new as the GGDMA, has, over the past year been lobbying the Government on numerous tax issues, some of these being: tributor’s tax, tax rate and outcomes. However, they were never able to get anywhere with this request but are hoping this could change soon.At the GGDMA’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) held on Friday it was revealed that submissions were made to Finance Minister Winston Jordan on September 20, 2017. This was followed by a meeting with the Minister and team on Thursday September 28, 2017.Subsequently a letter of justification along with an analysis was sent to the Minister on October 10, 2017 as to why the gold and diamond mining sector should be treated differently than the other sectors when it comes to taxes. While discussions are ongoing, the GGDMA hopes to have a favourable response.On February 1, 2017, tributors or persons engaged in the gold or diamond mining industry who are rewarded for their labour under the tribute system became subject to a 20 per cent withholding tax, instead of ten per cent which was previously deducted.Meanwhile, members of the GGDMA were also told that the association was able to negotiate a better package for all miners, whether they may be small, medium or large. This happened after lengthy negotiations with the Guyana Gold Board (GCB) on a new fee structure.A processing fee of $1,300 per ounce from one ounce and up to and including 100 ounces will be charged, while a processing fee of $1400 per ounce for every ounce starting from 101 ounces and for every additional ounce up to 200 ounces.Therefore, a downward sliding scale of $1300 per ounce from 201 ounces to 300 ounces; and then $1200 per ounce for all additional ounces between 301 ounces to 500 ounces, will be charged.There will also be a ceiling or maximum of $400,000 for all sales up to 1,000 ounces and for sales greater than 1000 ounces, the processing fee will be $400 per ounce, for every ounce above 1,000 ounces. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedMiners’ security, tax waivers among issues discussed between GGDMA and President RamotarAugust 24, 2013In “Local News”GGDMA says its disappointed with treatment of APNU AdministrationApril 26, 2017In “Business”Govt’ reduces tax on fuel for Miners as gold prices climbJanuary 14, 2015In “Business” read more

Associated Newspapers will consider an appeal over Denis OBrien ruling

first_imgTHE LAWYER REPRESENTING Associated Newspapers Ireland has expressed disappointment over a decision to award businessman Denis O’Brien €150,000 in damages in his defamation case against the Irish Daily Mail.“We are extremely disappointed with the outcome, even though the jury decided that Paul Drury expressed his views honestly,” said solicitor Michael Kealey.“This is a very sad day for all those who seek to voice strong opinions in our democracy.”kKealey said that the Irish Daily Mail would “continue to support the right of all our columnists to express a broad range of views, even if those may sometimes be uncomfortable.”He confirmed that his client will consider an appeal to the ruling.Read: Denis O’Brien awarded €150k in damages in defamation case against newspaperlast_img read more

Roman Polanski withdraws from French Oscars after backlash over his child rape

first_img By AFP 11,720 Views DIRECTOR ROMAN POLANSKI has pulled out of his role as the honorary host of the “French Oscars” – the Cesars – after pressure from women’s groups and the government over his child rape case.The setback underlines the pariah status of the maker of Chinatown and Rosemary’s Baby for many outside the film industry almost four decades after he was accused of raping a 13-year-old girl in Los Angeles.The controversy over his appearance at the Cesars ceremony next month, where he would have given the opening speech, “deeply saddened Roman Polanski and affected his family,” his lawyer Herve Temime said in a statement.Last month he won his legal fight to end efforts by the United States to extradite him from his native Poland for unlawful sex with a minor.Polanski confessed to the crime, which dates back to 1977.Leading French feminist group Osez le feminisme (“Dare to be Feminist”) had called the decision by the French Academy of Cinema Arts and Techniques to invite Polanski “shameful” and urged people to protest outside.France’s minister for women’s rights, Laurence Rossignol, said on Friday she found it “surprising and shocking” that the controversial filmmaker had been chosen for the awards.A petition calling for the 83-year-old to be removed garnered nearly 62,000 signatures.Film industry backingPolanski’s lawyer Temime said the decision to pull out had been made “in order not to disturb the Cesars ceremonies, which should focus on the cinema and not on the appointment of the (event’s) president.”His victim Samantha Geimer has previously appealed for the US case to be dropped, saying she wanted to move on.While the choice of the Franco-Polish film-maker caused outrage for some, the director won backing from many French industry insiders.“I spoke to him yesterday by phone and I think we shouldn’t have added problems to the problems. He’s deeply hurt,” said the director of the Cannes film festival, Thierry Fremaux.Polanski’s third wife, French actress Emmanuelle Seigner, posted a picture of a forest on Instagram where she said she had woken up “far from human nastiness and stupidity … and lies”.Polanski, who was 43 at the time of the rape, was accused of drugging Geimer before having sex with her.He pleaded guilty to unlawful sex with a minor, or statutory rape, as part of a plea bargain under which he served 42 days in detention while undergoing psychiatric evaluation.But in 1978, convinced that a judge was going to scrap the deal and hand him a hefty prison sentence, Polanski fled to France.© – AFP 2017Read: Warning of ‘extreme risk’ to citizens as the battle for Mosul rages on Image: AP/Press Association Images Roman Polanski withdraws from ‘French Oscars’ after backlash over his child rape case A petition calling for the 83-year-old to be removed garnered nearly 62,000 signatures. Tuesday 24 Jan 2017, 12:18 PM 35 Comments Jan 24th 2017, 12:18 PM Image: AP/Press Association Images http://jrnl.ie/3202295 Share4 Tweet Email Short URL Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

Preacher Brings God Satan and Hitler to SDCC

first_img 11 Forgotten Vertigo Comics That Would Make Awesome TV ShowsThe Greatest Romances in Comic Book History So that’s pretty much everything we come to Preacher for. In the panel afterwards, the cast and creators spoke about moving Angelville up in the story. Executive producer Sam Caitlin says they really wanted to get to Jesse’s grandma as fast as they could, according to CBR. “Tulip dies in the comic, but yeah we just sort of moved it up the schedule a bit. We always knew we had to go back to Angelville. It wouldn’t be Preacher if we didn’t see Gramma,” he said. Dominic Cooper agreed, saying their relationship lets him explore Jesse’s duality in a way the previous seasons didn’t get to.Ruth Negga promised that we should see plenty more of Tulip getting creative with her weaponry. That’s been one of the highlights of the show since the beginning, and we haven’t gotten to see much of it this season. It sounds like that’s going to change. “What I quite like is the peculiar weapons that she chooses. She just gets very creative. The writers got creative, and I followed through. That’s a lot of fun. They’re very tongue-in-cheek fight scenes and they’re just so funny to do,” She said. Negga added that she also deeply appreciates the stunt performers who work on the show for being so patient while she learns the moves. “He’s very good working with someone who’s… I’m not very good at fighting, and I’ve got two left feet as well.”Ruth Negga (Photo via AMC)The sentiments were echoed by the rest of the cast, and Caitlin admitted they just start writing fight scenes with the objects they want to use. “At this point, the scripts pretty much just say ‘a fight that involves a banana and this, an intestine.”They also further teased us about what we’ll see in the rest of Season Three. The love triangle between Jesse, Tulip and Cassidy probably won’t get revealed, but as we saw in the trailer, Cass gets to do a whole bunch of vampire stuff. Where things get really gross though, is the Grail. We meet the Allfather who eats pretty much everything. And throws it up. “He has a little wand to stick down his throat to make him throw up sometimes,” producer Evan Goldberg said.Rogen added this detail, “There’s a scene where they eat a horse. It was one of our favorite characters from the comics and is truly just a bizarre character and we hope to make good on that promise.” Well, it certainly sounds like they are.As for what we’ll see in the near future, this coming episode has Jesse submerged in water in a coffin. Cooper revealed he was actually in the coffin during that scene, a fact which surprised Rogen. He… doesn’t seem too thrilled about it. “We did not know that,” he said, according to Entertainment Weekly. “That’s the first we’re hearing of that. There was no need for that shot!” Rogen said the important thing was that no one got hurt, and that they’d “settle this later.” Whatever that means.For a show with as many fight scenes as Preacher has, they do take safety very seriously. Especially when so many of the fight scenes are improvised. They really do just write the items they want to be used. In a clip not released to the public, attendees got to see Jesse and Tulip fight T.C. and Jody. It’s the match-up we’ve been waiting for all season, and the rest of us will just have to wait until it airs on TV to see it.Noah Taylor as Adolf Hitler (Photo Credit: Michele K. Short/AMC/Sony Pictures Television)And yes, we will see Hitler very soon. As this season’s opening credits implies, he is indeed working at a sandwich shop. Though it’s clearly meant to be Subway, it seems the fast food chain had a problem with the suggestion that it would hire Adolph Hitler. Shame, because the Sandwich Artist jokes could be hilarious.“Hitler is too much for Subway. They’ve had some questionable sponsorship,” Rogen said. He later added that they never realized having Hitler as a character on the show would have real-world political implications. “We never guessed having Hitler on our show would be relevant. I wish it wasn’t. When we first did it, we were like ‘this is crazy’… but now it’s like ‘wow, there’s a lot we could be saying’ because we have Hitler on our show.”It really sounds like the best of Season Three is yet to come. The show has already begun to pick up and now, Tulip’s determined to kick God’s ass. It sounds like that’s definitely coming, but they may be holding the confrontation for next season. The producers realize though, that a confrontation with God is going to have to happen sooner rather than later. “One of these days he’s going to have to find God… and I think it’ll look pretty similar [to the comics]… I think Jesse needs to hold Him to account, whatever that looks like,” Caitlin said. Rogen and Goldberg agreed, saying that the season finale sets up a lot of what comics readers have been waiting for. So that sounds promising.Until then, we’ll just have to keep watching Preacher as it airs Sundays at 10 p.m. on AMC. Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on target It might seem weird for a TV show that’s midway through its season to have a Comic Con panel, but Preacher has a lot of good stuff to show off. The season took its time to get going, but from the looks of the Comic Con trailer screened at the panel last night, they’re saving the best for the second half. The footage contains pretty much everything we’ve wanted to see since Season Two ended: Hitler on Earth, the Allfather of The Grail, Satan in Angelville…. you know what? Just watch it.last_img read more

NXT Highlights Matt Riddle debuts Brawl before WarGames II Nikki Cross in

first_img WWE posted these highlights after last night’s episode of NXT on the WWE Network. Twitter WhatsApp Adam Martin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Live Podcast: Reviewing and discussing WWE Clash of Champions from Charlotte center_img Wrestleview Live #65: Reviewing and discussing WWE Clash of Champions from Charlotte Facebook Pinterest Video: Watch the live WWE Clash of Champions Kickoff Show from Charlotte tonightlast_img

Fourth site identified in possible measles case

first_imgClark County Public Health is continuing its investigation into a possible case of measles in a child, and has identified the Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Office Building as a fourth location where people may have been exposed to measles.People who visited the medical office, 2121 N.E. 139th St. in Vancouver, and used the lobbies, stairwells and elevators from 10:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 3 may have been exposed, according to a press release from Clark County Public Health.Three other businesses were also previously announced: J.C. Penney, 19005 S.E. Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver (from 2 to 5 p.m. June 27); Ross Dress for Less, 4708 N.E. Thurston Way, Vancouver (noon to 3 p.m. June 28); and Svitoch, 4804 N.E. Thurston Way, Vancouver (noon to 3 p.m. June 28).Measles is spread through the air from coughs or sneezes, and it is contagious before symptoms emerge, which is up to three weeks after exposure.Symptoms begin with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that generally begins at the head and spreads. The contagious stage usually lasts four days before the rash appears, and up to four days after the rash’s appearance.last_img read more

Clark Colleges enrollment down from a year ago

first_imgThe stadium-style lecture hall was filled with students Monday, the first day of winter term in instructor Mark Bolke’s anatomy and physiology class at Clark College.The class — a prerequisite for entrance into several popular health care programs, including nursing, dental hygiene and medical radiography — remains as in-demand as ever, even as the college’s overall enrollment for winter term has dropped.The college has enrolled 12,578 students this term, a drop from the 13,477 students enrolled this time last year.“We haven’t dropped off within our department, at least,” said Bolke, who’s taught anatomy and physiology for the past 15 years. “We’re sort of the exception here. We’re still holding strong.”This winter, there are roughly 120 anatomy and physiology students spread across three classes, on par with previous years. Bolke teaches the class in one of the campus’ two large lecture halls to accommodate all the students.He has no trouble filling the seats.“Anatomy and physiology classes are generally full,” he said, adding there are currently about 10 students waiting for someone to drop the course so they can get in.last_img read more

Enforcement directorate likely to scrutinise Bitcoin exchanges in India

first_imgIs Bitcoin really a bubble?Creative CommonsPopular virtual currency Bitcoin is in news for the past two weeks, as value shot up as much as 89 percent in December propelled by the introduction of futures contracts traded at the world’s largest exchange.Following the surge in price, Indian regulators have become cautious and started motoring exchanges in India. In the latest development, it is learnt that the Enforcement Directorate (ED) is likely to scrutinise Bitcoin exchanges across the country to check for potential violations of foreign exchange rules, Mint reported.Last week, the Income Tax Department had conducted survey operations at major Bitcoin exchanges across the country. A team led by the Bengaluru investigation wing had visited the premises of nine exchanges where Bitcoins are traded. The exchanges were located in New Delhi, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Kochi, and Gurugram.”It is I-T department which is heading the investigation. If it finds any violation of FEMA, we will launch an investigation. We are waiting for income-tax (department) to form its opinion on how to treat bitcoin,” an ED official told the business daily on condition of anonymity.Bitcoin issue is in patchy water, as the regulator has not legalised trading and transaction of virtual currency in the country and more importantly has not classified cryptocurrencies, hence, there has been a lot of confusion even in investigations.Many countries are treating virtual currencies as currencies and some are treating it as commodities. Proper classification is necessary as violations of rules for currency and commodity are different.Market analysts disagree on how virtual currencies should be classified, although market capitalization numbers for Bitcoin are being discussed as it is an asset (currency).”If bitcoin is a commodity, then goods and service tax should be payable. However, it is very early to say how bitcoins should be treated. It is after the analysis of the material collected during the survey (that) we will be able to say how bitcoin should be treated for taxation purpose,” an I-T department official said.The price of one Bitcoin surged to $18,979 on December 18 from, $10,001 on November 30. Since the start of 2017, Bitcoin price has soared as much as 1,766 percent.However, the surge is not unidirectional, there has been a lot of volatility in the Bitcoin price in between. Currently, it is been trading at $16,530 apiece after Wednesday’s closing.Earlier this month, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) had warned that it has not given any licence to anyone to operate virtual currencies such as Bitcoin.In a notification, the central bank said, “users, holders, and traders of Virtual Currencies (VCs) including Bitcoins regarding the potential economic, financial, operational, legal, customer protection and security related risks associated in dealing with such VCs.”last_img read more

Castros sixdecade rule nears end in Cuba

first_imgCuban President Raul Castro (L) talks with First Vice-Presidente Miguel Diaz-Canel during the First Annual Session of the Cuban Parliament at the Convention Palace in Havana. AFP file photoCuba is poised for the end of an era on Thursday as President Raul Castro steps down, formally handing power to his long-time deputy Miguel Diaz-Canel-and thereby ending his family’s six-decade grip on the island.The silver-haired Diaz-Canel, 57 — a top Communist Party figure who has served as first vice president since 2013 — will become the island’s first leader born after the 1959 revolution, and the first in 60 years who is not named Castro.Between them, father of the nation Fidel and his younger brother Raul made the Caribbean island a key player in the Cold War and helped keep communism afloat despite the collapse of the Soviet Union.Raul, now 86, has been in power since 2006, when he took over after illness sidelined Fidel, who seized power in the revolution.Diaz-Canel, who has spent years climbing the party ranks, was named the sole candidate for the presidency on Wednesday.He will formally be confirmed as the country’s leader at roughly 9:00 am (1300 GMT) Thursday-the anniversary of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, when Fidel Castro’s forces defeated 1,400 US-backed rebels seeking to overthrow him.Havana has long hailed the showdown as American imperialism’s first great defeat in Latin America.It is also the day before the new president’s 58th birthday.In Raul’s footstepsDiaz-Canel, who some say bears a passing resemblance to American actor Richard Gere, is a fan of The Beatles whose penchant for wearing jeans has set him apart in Havana’s corridors of power.Although he has advocated fewer restrictions on the press and a greater openness to the internet, he also has a ruthless streak, with harsh words for Cuba’s dissidents and the United States.Crucially, he will remain under the watchful eye of Castro, who will continue to serve as the head of Cuba’s all-powerful Communist Party.Once sworn in, Diaz-Canel will be tasked with pursuing reforms begun by Castro to open up Cuba’s economy to small private entrepreneurs and reach a rapprochement with its Cold War arch-enemy, the United States.In 2015, Havana and Washington renewed diplomatic ties, with then president Barack Obama making a historic visit to the island a year later.But, steps towards a normalization of ties have been severely curtailed since Donald Trump arrived in the White House last year.Continuity over changeDiaz-Canel will also inherit a youthful population hungry for change on the Caribbean island-one of the world’s last outposts of Communism since the collapse of the Soviet Union.Cuba watchers and domestic analysts say he will favor continuity over change in the early days of his presidency, however.As they began their momentous two-day meeting Wednesday, the 605 delegates of the National Assembly cast their votes for the new Council of State, which counts 31 members and whose head automatically becomes president.“I have the honorable mission of putting forward comrade Miguel Mario Diaz-Canel Bermudez as president of the Council of State,” commission president Gisela Duarte told assembly delegates, effectively ending any suspense over the identity of Cuba’s new leader.Delegates immediately broke into applause and the two men rose to share an embrace as Cuba’s two other vice presidents, both veterans of the revolution, looked on from the row behind.Thursday’s session will simply formalize the vote.last_img read more

Photos of the Week

first_img News As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Kit Doyle Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 By: Kit Doyle Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 The spiritual politics of presidential candidate Marianne Williamson center_img Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Each week Religion News Service presents a gallery of photos of religious expression around the world. This week’s gallery includes several elections, restorations at Notre Dame Cathedral and more.A couple performs morning rituals in the River Ganges on the first day of the nine-day Hindu festival of Navratri on the outskirts of Prayagraj, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, India, on April 6, 2019. Navaratri, or the festival of nine nights, consists of three days each devoted to the worship of Durga, the goddess of valor, Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, and Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)The statue of St. Andrew is lowered from atop Notre Dame Cathedral on April 11, 2019, in Paris, France. Sixteen greenish-gray copper statues, representing the twelve apostles and four evangelists, came down to earth for the first time in over a century as part of restorations at the famous Parisian cathedral. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)Russian Orthodox Church Patriarch Kirill, center, and other celebrants releases birds to mark the Russian Orthodox holiday of the Annunciation at the Annunciation Cathedral on Cathedral Square in Moscow, Russia, on April 7, 2019, . (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)A Muslim woman lifts her veil to identity herself to a polling agent before casting her vote in Shahpur, a village near Muzaffarnagar, Uttar Pradesh, India, on April 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)Faithful kneel on the newly restored Holy Stairs (Scala Sancta), which by Roman Catholic Church tradition are the stairs Jesus Christ climbed on his way to his trial in Jerusalem, at a special opening, in Rome, on April 11, 2019. The marble steps will be accessible until June 9, 2019, the Feast of the Pentecost, after which their walnut wood covering, ordered by Pope Innocent XIII in 1723 to protect them, will be reinstalled. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man votes in Israel’s parliamentary election at a polling station in Bnei Brak, Israel, on April 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)A girl at a rally in metropolitan Manila, Philippines, holds a candle beside paper crosses bearing the names of the dead from Negros Oriental province, on April 8, 2019. Philippine police recently said that 14 suspected communist rebels were killed after they opened fire during raids last March 30 in Negros Oriental, but rights groups countered that the men were farmers and the latest victims of extrajudicial killings. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)Nazi concentration camp survivor Petro Mishuk, of Ukraine, passes the camp entrance with the slogan ‘To Each His Own’ (Jedem das Seine) prior to a minute of silence in memory of the victims at commemoration ceremonies for the 74th anniversary of the liberation of the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on April 11, 2019. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)Members of the BYU combined choir raise their hands during a sustaining vote at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints conference on April 6, 2019, in Salt Lake City.  (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)An exiled Tibetan woman prays as she prostrates in front of a portrait of her spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, in Dharmsala, India, on April 10, 2019. The Dalai Lama was briefly hospitalized in the Indian capital with a chest infection. (AP Photo/Ashwini Bhatia) Tagshomepage featured photos photos of the week Top Story,You may also like By: Kit Doyle Kit Doyle,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris ravaged by fire By: Kit Doyle Share This! Catholicismlast_img read more