Army Expects to Expand Fort Hood Job Transition Program

first_img ADC AUTHOR A Fort Hood pilot program that pays soldiers while they work for civilian licenses and professional certifications may be expanded beyond Texas, Stars and Stripes reported.Army Sgt. Major Dan Dailey recently told a House subcommittee that the job transition program is expected to expand to all Army installations by Oct. 1.“The U.S. Army has almost 150 military occupational skills, much of which directly translate to necessary high-skilled training jobs out in the civilian sector,” Dailey said. “What (soldiers) lack is the civilian credentials in order to obtain those jobs.”The program, which provides separating soldiers an opportunity to gain civilian credential and licensing, originated at Fort Hood due to the success of its education center, the availability of soldiers in a range of occupations, and partnerships with the local community and nearby Central Texas College.Data on the program is expected to be available following the end of the one-year test period.Army photo by Maj. Paul Oliverlast_img read more

HSC and equivalent exams begin today

first_imgHSC and its equivalent examinations of 2018 under 10 education boards begin across the country today. Photo: BSSThe Higher Secondary Certificate (HSC) and its equivalent examinations of 2018 under 10 education boards begin across the country today amid tough measures taken to check question paper leakage and other malpractices in the examinations.A total of 13,11,457 examinees from 8,864 educational institutions will appear in the examinations this year. Of them, 6, 35,697 are male and 5,47,989 female, said officials of the education ministry.They said only the in-charge officers of respective centres will be allowed to enter the examination halls with mobile phones as they will be given instruction via a text message about the set of question papers.The authorities will open envelopes of question papers about 25 minutes before the examinations start and they have already taken decision to shut down all the coaching centres till completion of the examinations, a top official of the ministry told a meeting recently.He said all the authorities concerned are sincerely working to root out all possible sources of question paper leakage as a vested quarter is involved in the malpractices.A total of 10,92,607 candidates are set to sit for the examinations from eight general education boards while 1, 00,127 under the Madrasa Education Board and 1, 17,754 from the Technical education board. A total of 1, 27,771 candidates have been increased this year comparing to the previous year.Besides, 299 students will appear in the examinations from seven overseas centres.All the examinees have been asked to take their seats in the examination centres 30 minutes before the examinations begin.The written examinations will continue until 13 May while the practical examinations will be held from 14 to 23 May.Candidates with physical disabilities will receive an additional 20 minutes in the examinations while the examinees with special needs, including those with autism, will get 30 additional minutes.A total of 11, 83,686 examinees appeared in the HSC and equivalent examinations last year.last_img read more

Seeing through paint

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — When light passes through materials that we consider opaque, such as paint, biological tissue, fabric and paper, it is scattered in such a complex way that an image does not come through. “It is possible to see the light, but not the information,” Sylvain Gigan tells PhysOrg.com. “We wanted to create a way to see the information through opaque media.” Citation: ‘Seeing’ through paint (2010, March 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-03-seeing-through-paint.html More information: Popff, et. al., “Measuring the Transmission Matrix in Optics: An Approach to the Study and Control of Light Propagation in Disordered Media,” Physical Review Letters (2010). Available online: link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.100601 Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Schematic of the apparatus. The laser is expanded and reflected off a SLM. The phase-modulated beam is focused on the multiple-scattering sample and the output intensity speckle pattern is imaged by a CCD camera: lens (L), polarizer (P), diaphragm (D). Image (c) 2010 American Physical Society, DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.100601 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further How to see through opaque materials Gigan is a scientist at the City of Paris Industrial Physics and Chemistry Higher Educational Institute (ESPCI). Gigan worked in a group with Popoff, Lerosey, Carminati, Fink and Boccara to create an experiment that demonstrates that it is possible to construct a transmission matrix that allows them to “see” through some opaque materials. The results of their experiment are described in Physical Review Letters: “Measuring the Transmission Matrix in Optics: An Approach to the Study and Control of Light Propagation in Disordered Media.”“When people try to look into an opaque medium, especially biological material, they use the ballistic light, the light that has not been mixed up by the medium due to scattering. But as you go into the medium, the ballistic light becomes less intense, limited by the scattering process.”Instead of being limited by scattering, though, the group at ESPCI instead looked for ways to use scattering to their advantage. Gigan and his colleagues passed light through zinc oxide, which is common in paint. They observed the way the light of a laser scattered as it passed through, and then created a numerical model to describe the result. “This transmission matrix is a map through the medium,” Gigan explains. “Once we have the transmission matrix, it is possible to analyze whatever pattern goes through.”The process provides the means to put together an image of something on the other side, allowing the researchers to “see” through the zinc oxide layer, even though it is opaque. Reversal is also possible, offering a way to tailor a beam that could pass through opaque material, and then focus. “Such a method could allow for applications in imaging of biological material, among other applications,” Gigan says. “This provides a way to transmit information or focus light in a medium that wouldn’t by any classical means allow that.”There are limitations, however. “This should not be construed to mean that we can see through walls with this technique,” Gigan points out. “Some degree of light has to be able to pass through, and a wall stops light from coming out the other side. You could use white fabric, paint, or paper, though. Even biological tissue, like a chicken breast, could work.”Gigan also admits that so far the process is rather slow. “Getting the matrix is a slow process, taking minutes. We used paint because it is so stable. If you wanted to actually go through biological media, or through liquid, it wouldn’t work with our current set-up, since the light transmission changes as the medium moves.”For now, the group at ESPCI is working on tackling the problems presented by technology. “The main limitation for using this technique in biological microscopy is technical. There are some hints of how to get the transmission matrix faster, but at the moment we’re not really ready.”Despite the limitations, Gigan sees some current applications. “There are implications for nanotechnology, and the propagation of light in this system is interesting. It offers a basis for the idea of manipulating the light wave, and we believe this could be a promising approach to imaging. Perhaps in five years we will have the technology to take this even further.”last_img read more

3 Ways to End Technology Distraction

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. June 7, 2016 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Not feeling yourself lately? Lacking motivation at work? Losing patience with people? Before making a drastic change in your life, read on, because the problem and solution may be simpler than you think.Related: 6 Ways to Break a Tech AddictionIn fact, the better, more relevant question to ask ourselves may be, how often do we check our phones each day? For many of us, pulling out our phones has become almost as natural as walking.We’re at a point now where it’s next to impossible for most of us to sit alone in public without finding comfort in that powerful device. Because . . . well . . . who just sits alone and does nothing? That’s weird.The trouble is, it’s not weird. Rather, most of us are simply not recognizing the detriment our addiction has on our psychological health and our performance at work. We don’t acknowledge how our attachment to our phones is sabotaging our relationships.It’s not technology itself that’s hurting us, it’s our overuse of it that is crippling the resources in our brain.In short, technology accelerates brain fatigue on a daily basis. This is a big reason why, nowadays, we all feel exhausted at the end of each day, despite sitting at a desk all day long!What distraction does to your brainOur brains weren’t designed to operate effectively in this age of information overload. Every time we shift our attention from one thing to the next, our brains use up additional energy to make that transition happen. And a “transition” can be as small as moving from one Facebook post to the next, or from an email, to a text, to a conversation.Yet the more we do this throughout the day, the faster we tire. Think of your brain like a muscle: Every time you shift your attention to something new, imagine that it does a squat — the kind you do in the gym.Studies say we lose track of our attention six-to-ten times a minute. Going with a lower-end estimation here, and factoring in sleep, that’s approximately 6,120 brain squats a day!The difficulty is that brain fatigue makes it hard for us to regulate our emotions. Feeling happy, loved or determined requires energy, and when that’s depleted, we simply lack the resources to sustain those positive emotions. That makes it difficult for us to stay motivated and focused at work, and makes it challenging to remain patient with the people around us.Related: Will.i.am, ‘Dumb-thumbing,’ and the Perils of Tech AddictionI’ve personally experienced chronic fatigue before and can say that it often makes you feel that you just don’t care about things going on in your life, even when you know you should.Add in some additional stress to that, and you may overreact, act out of character or in some other way simply not be yourself. Here, then, are three ways to conserve your energy and reduce your dependency on technology:1. Discipline is a habit.The truth about discipline is that some people are naturally more talented at it. For some, it’s easy to stick to a workout routine, follow a strict schedule each day or say no to that last drink. But the reality is that that same discipline can also be built up within you.The trouble is, most of us don’t look at the finer details that make up discipline. We think that the odd glance at our phone, a quick scroll through Instagram or a short reply to a text message isn’t a big deal. And in the grand scheme of things, it’s not. However, habits are formed from consistency. So, those tiny, consistent actions we do every day, and sometimes every hour, build up to habitual attention-shifting.Our brains get so conditioned to looking at any shiny object in our peripheral vision that they have no resistance to distraction — a scenario that gets worse over time, slowly lowering our productivity.To build up your discipline, understand that each attention transition is either making you form the bad habit of distraction or is otherwise sapping your mental energy.Know that both of these are ultimately eroding your ability to focus on your more important tasks later in the day. Even having your phone next to your computer will cause your mind to fight itself over not checking it. So, put it on, on “silent”; turn off the flashing light; or better yet, toss it in your bag. Try to check your phone only once every 60 minutes, and build this new habit up over time.2. Phone management in the morning. After turning off your alarm in the morning, take some time before looking at your phone. Why? The light from your screen triggers your brain to go into a reactive mode. It becomes almost a fight-or-flight state. Your brain has learned that when the phone is on, potential threats may be coming your way, as emails, text messages and notifications.Sure, you may not consciously see these as threats, but your brain will, when you start thinking, “Did my client email me back?” “Did that deal close?” “Is my friend mad at me?” or, “I hope I got more than a few likes on my Facebook post.”For the first week, don’t look at your phone for 15 minutes; the second week, aim for 30 minutes; the third week, try for 45 minutes and so on, until you don’t look at your phone just before you leave for work. Obviously, this won’t happen every day, but it’s not about never looking at your phone; it’s simply about looking at it less.3. Wrap your experiences with clarity.When we have an experience in life, our brains create a memory of it. This memory is held in the connections between neurons. These neural connections either get stronger or weaker depending on how often we repeat that experience, and feel the similar emotions that come along with it. Which makes it easier or harder for our brains to reference going forward.The trouble is, if we are constantly pulling out our phones with everything we experience, we’re disrupting those patterns that are being formed. For example, if you’re reading a novel, but you can’t stop from checking your phone every 10 minutes, you’re weakening your ability to stay focused on that literary state.What’s more, the memory within those neural connections that had remembered reading as a place of calm, relaxation and focus, slowly dissipates. In the past, when you picked up a book, your brain could use those inner strengths because they were so strong from years of practice. But, when we disrupt that process time and time again, we lose the ability to recall those strengths when we need them.You can fix this by what you do before, during and after an experience. Try to give yourself a minute before you start a new activity, and during that minute remain phone free. Let your mind relax and forget about your last email, so it is prepared for this new activity.Once you’ve begun the new activity, whether it’s going for a walk, working on a project or reading, take 10 seconds to stop and take in the moment. Recognize what’s going on, the actions you’re taking and the positive feelings you get from those actions. Finally, after the activity ends, give yourself another minute to appreciate what you’ve just completed and accomplished before you look at your phone.Related: The 6 Signs You’re Tech Addicted and What You Can Do About ItThis process will help strengthen those neural connections and everything good that comes from those experiences. More importantly, it will make you less susceptible to distraction and less vulnerable to temptation. 7 min read Register Now »last_img read more