JU students end hunger strike

first_imgJU students during a fast unto death on Monday. Photo: Prothom AloThe four students of Jahangirnagar University, who were on a fast unto death for the past three days, ended their protest after the authorities on Monday promised withdrawal of charges against 56 students for vandalising the vice-chancellor’s residence.The students took the decision of calling off the hunger strike around 7:30pm as JU pro vice-chancellor professor Amir Hossian assured them of withdrawing the case, said Bangladesh Chhatra Union JU unit president Imran Nadim, reports UNB.Pro VC Amir Hossain made the students drink water for breaking their fast after the students took the decision.JU treasurer Sheikh M Manjarul Haque, its proctor Tapan Kumar, JU Teacher Association President professor Farid Ahmed and other teachers and students were present at that time.The students started their fast unto death at 2:00pm on Saturday at the Central Shaheed Minar premises on the campus and continued their strike for the third consecutive day till Monday evening demanding the removal of the case.They are Puja Biswas, a 40th batch student of International Relations, Sarder Zahid and Tuli, 42nd batch students of English department and Arman, a 43rd batch student of Law and Justice Department.On 26 May last, students blocked Dhaka-Aricha highway for six hours following the deaths of two fellow students in a road accident in Savar. But police fired rubber bullets and tear gas shells to disperse them.Later, the students reportedly besieged and ransacked the VC’s residence protesting at police attack on them.Later on 27 May, university administration filed a case against 56 students bringing the allegation of vandalising the VC’s house.last_img read more

No turning back as Brexit triggered

first_imgA newspaper stand shows a copy of today’s Evening Standard, with the front page story relating to British Prime Minister Theresa May’s triggering of Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty to begin the process of Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union (EU), in London. Photo: AFPBritain launched the historic process of leaving the EU on Wednesday, saying there was “no turning back”, but its European partners were quick to warn of the difficult path ahead.Nine months after the stunning vote for Brexit, Prime Minister Theresa May gave EU President Donald Tusk formal notification of Britain’s intention to withdraw from the 28-nation bloc.The unprecedented move, just days after the EU celebrated its 60th birthday, leaves Britain deeply divided and has thrown a question mark over the future of the alliance.“This is an historic moment from which there can be no turning back,” May told MPs, to cheers from members of her ruling Conservative party.British ambassador Tim Barrow delivered the letter to Tusk triggering Article 50 of the EU’s Lisbon Treaty, starting the two-year countdown to Brexit.“We already miss you,” Tusk said in Brussels.But French President Francois Hollande struck a tough tone, warning that Brexit would be “economically painful” for Britain, the first country to leave the alliance.German Chancellor Angela Merkel also rebuffed May’s call for negotiations on Britain’s withdrawal to run alongside talks on a future trade agreement.Britain intends to leave Europe’s single market in order to control migration, but is hopeful a new trade deal can be struck before it leaves the EU by the latest at midnight on 29 March 2019.Merkel said however that the divorce must come first—including tough talks on Britain’s financial contributions, as well as immigration.“Only when this question is dealt with, can we, hopefully soon after, begin talking about our future relationship,” she said in Berlin.The EU, which was forged from the ashes of World War II, is determined the Brexit deal will not encourage other countries to follow Britain out of the door.May’s six-page letter struck a conciliatory tone and called for a “deep and special partnership” with the bloc, which Britain joined in 1973.But some commentators saw a threat in her emphasis on the importance of Britain’s security ties.She warned that failure to reach a new trade agreement would mean “cooperation in the fight against crime and terrorism would be weakened”.‘Damage control’Tusk is expected to issue draft guidelines for the negotiations on Friday, but the leaders of the other 27 EU nations will not meet until 29 April to confirm their joint approach.The bloc’s priority is to maintain unity as it faces the departure of one of its largest members, against a backdrop of crises involving migration, terrorism and the rise of populism.A spokesman for US President Donald Trump, who has described the Brexit vote as “smart”, said: “We want the UK to remain a strong leader in Europe.”But May is battling to keep her divided nation together.The Brexit vote was only won by a narrow 52-48 margin and Scotland’s nationalist government is now calling for a fresh referendum on independence.May has said “now is not the time”, even if Scotland—and Northern Ireland—voted overwhelmingly to stay in the EU, but were outvoted by England and Wales.In Edinburgh, 44-year-old computer consultant Mark Murphy said he had voted for Scotland to stay a part of Britain in a 2014 referendum but might now change his mind.Brexit was “probably the daftest thing we’ve done as a nation for my entire life”, he said.‘Implementation periods’As with many divorces, negotiations with the EU could rapidly turn nasty over money.The priority for Brussels is settling Britain’s outstanding bills, estimated at between 55 and 60 billion euros ($59-65 billion) — an early battle that could set the tone for the rest of the talks.Both sides are also keen to see a reduction in tensions in Northern Ireland, which will have the UK’s only hard border with the EU.Many business leaders are deeply concerned about May’s decision to leave Europe’s single market, a free trade area of 500 million people that represents Britain’s largest trading partner.The Brexit vote sent the pound plunging and there are fears of what will happen if negotiations end without a new trade agreement in place.The European Parliament’s chief negotiator, Guy Verhofstadt, said any transitional deal to work out the details of a trade agreement should be limited.“We propose three years,” he said.‘Dream come true’Both sides have said they want an early agreement over the post-Brexit status of more than three million European nationals living in Britain.May has said this will be conditional on a deal for the status of one million British expats in the EU.Nicolas Hatton, a Frenchman with a British wife who leads a grassroots campaign for EU expatriates, said he wanted a deal “so that we can get on with our lives”.Tens of thousands marched through London on Saturday demanding Britain stay in the EU, with one banner urging politicians to “stop this madness”.But others were elated that Brexit was finally under way.In Sunderland, a bastion of Brexit support in northeast England, former miner Tom Curras said: “I don’t believe that we should be dominated by other countries.”Nigel Farage, the founder of the anti-immigration UK Independence Party (UKIP) and a key player in the Brexit campaign, celebrated in a pub near parliament.“Today’s the day for me after 25 years of campaigning that the impossible dream came true,” he said—before a passerby heckled him as “a disgrace”.last_img read more

Spiking DC Violence Spurs Calls for Culture Change

first_imgWith two months left in 2015, as of Oct. 9 the District of Columbia has 120 homicides. That figure is 44.6 percent higher than 2014.Benjamin Crump, President of the National Bar Association.Across the United States, families, cities, and communities are grappling with a culture of violence manifested by tens of thousands killed each year by guns, mass murders on campuses, in workplaces and homes, and domestic violence perpetuated primarily against women.For the last three years, Stephanie E. Myers, national co-chair of Black Women for Positive Change, has spearheaded what is growing into a national effort to combat this pervasive violence. She, along with a number of supporters, kicked off the Week of NonViolence on the steps of city hall in D.C. The week of nonviolence is scheduled from Oct.17 to Oct. 25.“This is a very serious issue facing America,” said Myers at a press conference on Oct. 9. “We want to go on record that like Fannie Lou Hamer, we’re sick and tired of young people killed on the street, sick and tired of little girls murdered in their front yard, sick and tired of people attacking our schools, and sick and tired of law enforcement taking advantage because they have weapons and overstep their authority.”She said events and activities will take place in cities such as Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Chicago, Alexandria and Hampton Roads, Virginia, and St. Louis, Missouri. These events would include a summit on Oct. 17, workshops and seminars and related activities throughout the week. “I believe that it’s time for families, youth, actors, professionals, athletes to come together and that we can change the culture,” Myers said.The regional steering committee for the week is comprised of Christian ministers and priests, Rabbis, Imams and members of other faiths. Alongside them are businesspeople, government officials, residents, and representatives of civil society.Several members of the committee expressed concern about escalating violence on various levels, including homicides in D.C., domestic violence in Prince George’s County, Maryland, and bullying in Alexandria, Virginia.“[Alexandria] Mayor [Bill] Euille and folks from the DMV are working hard to stop violence,” said Ward 5 Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie (D). “According the CDC, the leading cause of death [for young black men between the ages of 15-34] is homicide. I don’t know about you, but that’s a crisis. We need, as governments, to use every resource to stem the tide of violence.”“The culture of violence exists in some American communities,” McDuffie continued. “We cannot arrest ourselves out of this, which is why I advocate a health approach using workforce development, educational agencies, and law enforcement.”Benjamin L. Crump, the attorney representing the families of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, unarmed teens shot and killed by a vigilante in 2012 and a Missouri police officer in 2014, respectively, said, “We want to bring attention to dialogue to address violence that happens way too often.” Dr. Myers took leadership and action to stand up for the community, stand up for our children. I’d rather see a sermon rather than hear a sermon every day of the week. What she’s doing is not for the media or the government. It’s for the children.”Mel Franklin, chairman of the Prince George’s County Council, said the community has needed to hear some uncomfortable truths for a long time. “Prince George’s County has the highest incidence of domestic violence in the state of Maryland,” he said. “The overwhelming majority of cases is caused by men. It’s something we have to own up to. And make men and boys a part of this. How do we solve the problem and use of violence? We need to add men’s absence [from the home] and our own personal responsibility. We have to roll up our sleeves and think out of the box.”“Domestic violence knows no race class or division, knows no boundary,” Franklin continued. “We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality . . . This is an opportunity for all of us to join together on an issue that is a clarion call to end violence.”last_img read more

Study shows nonlinear pattern of migration due to climatic variations

first_img © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Study shows nonlinear pattern of migration due to climatic variations (2014, June 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-nonlinear-pattern-migration-due-climatic.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Indonesia is the fourth most populous country in the world with its people scattered over many islands. It’s also a place with frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions—approximately 40 percent of the people in that country make their living from agriculture, generally near the coasts. Taken together, these factors will likely mean major disruptions for the country as global warming causes temperatures to rise, rainfall to change and sea levels to rise. In their study, the researchers sought to learn how temperature and rainfall changes impacted permanent migration in the country, from one region or island to another.The researchers used data from the Rand Corporation’s, The Indonesia Family Life Survey, which has been running since 1993/94. Among other things, the survey tracks the movement of 7,185 people living in that country. The researchers compared the migratory data from the survey with weather data from the same period to see if any patterns might emerge. They found that if the average temperature for any given place was below, 25 °C, small increases in temperature did not give rise to permanent migrations. In places where the average temperature was above 25 °C, however, temperature increases did cause permanent migration to occur. And the more temperature increased, the more people moved away. As an example, they noted that a one degree rise, from 26 to 27 degrees raised the probability of migration by 0.8 percent, but the probability jumped to 1.4 percent if the temperature rose from 27 to 28 degrees. They noted that changes in rainfall had a similar impact, but was not as pronounced.The team conducted similar studies on natural disasters in the area to see if they had a similar impact and found migration from such events tended to be short term as people generally moved back when able to do so.The researchers suggest their results indicate that Indonesia is likely to see large permanent migration as global warming causes rising temperatures, with people moving away from some of the most heavily populated provinces, such as Jakarta. They note also that such migration trends are likely to occur in other countries as well. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) —A team of researchers in the U.S. has found that local temperature increases only caused permanent migration in Indonesia when such increases occurred above 25 °C, providing hints of possible migration patterns as global warming continues in the future. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they used data from another study to track migration over a multi-year period as a means of predicting migration patterns due to global warming.center_img Nonlinear effects of temperature and precipitation on annual migration probability. Credit: Pratikshya Bohra-Mishra, PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1317166111 Explore further Research duo quantify global human migration numbers More information: Nonlinear permanent migration response to climatic variations but minimal response to disasters, Pratikshya Bohra-Mishra, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1317166111AbstractWe present a microlevel study to simultaneously investigate the effects of variations in temperature and precipitation along with sudden natural disasters to infer their relative influence on migration that is likely permanent. The study is made possible by the availability of household panel data from Indonesia with an exceptional tracking rate combined with frequent occurrence of natural disasters and significant climatic variations, thus providing a quasi-experiment to examine the influence of environment on migration. Using data on 7,185 households followed over 15 y, we analyze whole-household, province-to-province migration, which allows us to understand the effects of environmental factors on permanent moves that may differ from temporary migration. The results suggest that permanent migration is influenced by climatic variations, whereas episodic disasters tend to have much smaller or no impact on such migration. In particular, temperature has a nonlinear effect on migration such that above 25 °C, a rise in temperature is related to an increase in outmigration, potentially through its impact on economic conditions. We use these results to estimate the impact of projected temperature increases on future permanent migration. Though precipitation also has a similar nonlinear effect on migration, the effect is smaller than that of temperature, underscoring the importance of using an expanded set of climatic factors as predictors of migration. These findings on the minimal influence of natural disasters and precipitation on permanent moves supplement previous findings on the significant role of these variables in promoting temporary migration.Press releaselast_img read more