PSG sporting director confirms Rabiots endofseason club exit

first_imgPSG’s sporting director confirmed that Adrien Rabiot, 23, did not want to sign a new deal with the club and wants to leave at the end of the season as a free transfer.Antero Henrique, Paris Saint-Germain’s sporting director, stated that Rabiot’s decision to leave means he will remain on the French club’s indefinitely. Asked if the club would try to convince Rabiot to stay, Henrique said: “At this point, no. It was a decision made by the club following a meeting I had with the player,” according to Yahoo Sports.“The player informed me that he would not sign a contract and that he wanted to leave the club by being free at the end of the season, ie at the end of his contract.Neymar responds to PSG criticism with a stunning winner Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Despite all the backlash he got today at Parc des Princes, Neymar responded by scoring a stunning winner vs Strasbourg.We all knew that Neymar’s…“For the player, this will have a very clear consequence: he will remain on the bench for an indefinite period.”“It seems that the player and his representative have misled us for several months,” Henrique added. “I must add that this situation is disrespectful for both the club and the fans.“Especially from a player who has played under our colors from the training center to the first team. A player who has always received the full support of the club”last_img read more

Navy Would Lose Carrier Air Wing under FY17 Request

first_imgThe Navy would cut an aircraft carrier air wing based at Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif., along with its five associated squadrons, under its $165 billion budget request for fiscal 2017 released earlier this week.The proposal would reduce the number of aircraft carrier air wings in the Navy from 10 to nine.“This proposal will allow the Navy to match the number of air wings to the number of deployable aircraft carriers,” Rear Adm. William Lescher told reporters during a budget briefing Tuesday. “It reflects the practice of having one carrier in refueling and complex overhaul, and one carrier in an extended maintenance availability at any time,” said Lescher, the service’s deputy assistant secretary for budget.The aircraft would be allocated among the remaining squadrons and would boost readiness among the squadrons by reducing the dwell time between deployments, he said. Deployments can last for up to four years for wings attached to carriers undergoing refueling and a complex overhaul, reported Navy Times.The plan already has been attacked by the chairmen of the House and Senate Armed Services committees.Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-Texas.) told reporters the Navy’s proposal was “a little disturbing,” but said would study it more closely before offering an official position. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said the request likely was a non-starter.Rep. Randy Forbes (R-Va.), chairman of the House Armed Services’ Seapower Subcommittee, pointed to the plan as simply the latest attempt by the Obama administration to shrink the Navy, reported Politico. “So far, we’ve been pretty successful in putting all that back,” he said. “When you look right now and we have gaps with our carriers currently, and they’re going to take out an air wing? I mean, it really doesn’t make good military sense,” Forbes said.The budget request also calls for the Navy to eliminate 6,300 sailor slots, shrinking the service from 329,200 billets to 322,900 billets. The proposal includes the cruiser modernization program, which the service first broached two years ago. It would dock up to half of the fleet’s 22 cruisers to reduce staffing needs and extend the ships’ service lives.“This is an approach that leverages the saving of over $3 billion over [the next five years] in operating costs and maintains the best overall force balance,” Lescher said. “It retains the air-defense commander capable platforms in the force into the 2040s and allows us to reallocate personnel elsewhere in the fleet.” Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Facebook Expands Use Of Facial Recognition To ID Users In Photos

first_img Share Facebook Facebook will soon begin alerting users of photos that feature them, based on facial recognition technology.Facebook is expanding its use of facial recognition software to alert users when photos of them are posted on the platform — whether or not they are tagged in the photo.By default, Facebook users in the U.S. will be signed up for these face recognition alerts, unless they have previously opted out of a similar, more limited feature. But users can turn off face recognition, Facebook says.Additionally, the company says it will roll out new tools to alert users if someone else may be impersonating them with a misleading profile photo.Facebook has been using facial recognition technology since 2010 to detect faces in photos and look for recognizable patterns to identify individuals. Facebook had the ability to pair names with faces thanks to the “tag photos” feature, which people use to label themselves and their friends in pictures. The tags act as links to the Facebook profiles of those in the photo.For years, the social media giant has offered “tag suggestion.” When a Facebook user uploaded a photo, the user would have the option of tagging the photo or labeling the people in it. Using its data on previous tags, Facebook would prompt the user uploading the photo to add more tags, using facial recognition to suggest people it recognized. Those who were tagged were sent notifications.Now, Facebook is cutting out the human element of that process. If facial recognition software identifies you in a photo, you’ll be automatically notified — no need for the person who posted the photo to approve a tag.This is only true for photos you are able to see. If a stranger adds a photo of you and makes it visible to just their friend group, you wouldn’t be notified, for instance.There are two related features that Facebook is planning to roll out soon.“We want people to feel confident when they post pictures of themselves on Facebook so we’ll soon begin using face recognition technology to let people know when someone else uploads a photo of them as their profile picture,” Joaquin Quiñonero Candela, the director of applied machine learning at Facebook, writes in a blog post. “We’re doing this to prevent people from impersonating others on Facebook.”Facebook will also use facial recognition to describe photos to people with visual impairments, “even if people aren’t tagged,” Candela writes.Users will be able to turn off all facial recognition features in their settings, under an option called “Face Recognition,” with just two options: yes and no. If you want to opt out, choosing “no” will keep Facebook from identifying your face to you and others based on face recognition. But it doesn’t stop Facebook from looking for other people’s faces in your photos.Before that option becomes available, you can achieve the same thing by turning off tag suggestions in your Facebook settings.The new option is not available in Canada and the European Union, Facebook notes, without explanation.Regulators in both markets have previously raised concerns about the security and privacy implications of automatic facial recognition.Under Canada’s privacy and personal information laws, all users must meaningfully consent to use of their personal information, and security must be safeguarded.In the EU, Facebook’s “tag suggestion” feature was previously found to violate privacy laws because it was opt-out instead of opt-in, raising questions about consent.More recently, Facebook’s Moments photo app was rolled out separately in the EU and Canada to leave out facial recognition technology.You might be wondering: “Should I be afraid of face recognition technology?”Facebook certainly assumes you’re asking that question. That was the title of a corporate blog post Tuesday from deputy chief privacy officer Rob Sherman, who noted that face recognition can be used both for innocuous reasons like sorting photos, as well as in “concerning ways.” It also acknowledged the “potential for racial bias.”Sherman wrote that Facebook has “no plans” to roll out features that “tell strangers who you are,” and emphasized users’ ability to opt out of the feature.If you are, in fact, wondering if you ought to be afraid, you might want to check out a more skeptical view of Facebook’s privacy practices from privacy watchdog group EPIC.The Government Accountability Office also examined the question of facial recognition technology in 2015 and found that “no federal privacy law expressly regulates commercial uses of facial recognition technology.”Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Study shows nonlinear pattern of migration due to climatic variations

first_img © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Study shows nonlinear pattern of migration due to climatic variations (2014, June 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-nonlinear-pattern-migration-due-climatic.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Indonesia is the fourth most populous country in the world with its people scattered over many islands. It’s also a place with frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions—approximately 40 percent of the people in that country make their living from agriculture, generally near the coasts. Taken together, these factors will likely mean major disruptions for the country as global warming causes temperatures to rise, rainfall to change and sea levels to rise. In their study, the researchers sought to learn how temperature and rainfall changes impacted permanent migration in the country, from one region or island to another.The researchers used data from the Rand Corporation’s, The Indonesia Family Life Survey, which has been running since 1993/94. Among other things, the survey tracks the movement of 7,185 people living in that country. The researchers compared the migratory data from the survey with weather data from the same period to see if any patterns might emerge. They found that if the average temperature for any given place was below, 25 °C, small increases in temperature did not give rise to permanent migrations. In places where the average temperature was above 25 °C, however, temperature increases did cause permanent migration to occur. And the more temperature increased, the more people moved away. As an example, they noted that a one degree rise, from 26 to 27 degrees raised the probability of migration by 0.8 percent, but the probability jumped to 1.4 percent if the temperature rose from 27 to 28 degrees. They noted that changes in rainfall had a similar impact, but was not as pronounced.The team conducted similar studies on natural disasters in the area to see if they had a similar impact and found migration from such events tended to be short term as people generally moved back when able to do so.The researchers suggest their results indicate that Indonesia is likely to see large permanent migration as global warming causes rising temperatures, with people moving away from some of the most heavily populated provinces, such as Jakarta. They note also that such migration trends are likely to occur in other countries as well. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) —A team of researchers in the U.S. has found that local temperature increases only caused permanent migration in Indonesia when such increases occurred above 25 °C, providing hints of possible migration patterns as global warming continues in the future. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they used data from another study to track migration over a multi-year period as a means of predicting migration patterns due to global warming.center_img Nonlinear effects of temperature and precipitation on annual migration probability. Credit: Pratikshya Bohra-Mishra, PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1317166111 Explore further Research duo quantify global human migration numbers More information: Nonlinear permanent migration response to climatic variations but minimal response to disasters, Pratikshya Bohra-Mishra, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1317166111AbstractWe present a microlevel study to simultaneously investigate the effects of variations in temperature and precipitation along with sudden natural disasters to infer their relative influence on migration that is likely permanent. The study is made possible by the availability of household panel data from Indonesia with an exceptional tracking rate combined with frequent occurrence of natural disasters and significant climatic variations, thus providing a quasi-experiment to examine the influence of environment on migration. Using data on 7,185 households followed over 15 y, we analyze whole-household, province-to-province migration, which allows us to understand the effects of environmental factors on permanent moves that may differ from temporary migration. The results suggest that permanent migration is influenced by climatic variations, whereas episodic disasters tend to have much smaller or no impact on such migration. In particular, temperature has a nonlinear effect on migration such that above 25 °C, a rise in temperature is related to an increase in outmigration, potentially through its impact on economic conditions. We use these results to estimate the impact of projected temperature increases on future permanent migration. Though precipitation also has a similar nonlinear effect on migration, the effect is smaller than that of temperature, underscoring the importance of using an expanded set of climatic factors as predictors of migration. These findings on the minimal influence of natural disasters and precipitation on permanent moves supplement previous findings on the significant role of these variables in promoting temporary migration.Press releaselast_img read more