UMF students expected to return for start of fall semester

first_imgFARMINGTON – The University of Maine at Farmington has announced plans to welcome new and returning students to campus for the fall 2020 semester, with in-person classes expected to begin on Aug. 31. Course work will shift to remote learning on Nov. 25 for the remainder of the semester.The university will craft a framework to enable the safe return of students to the campus with guidance from the University of Maine System, UMF officials said Wednesday.“Farmington is dedicated to creating a safe and supportive campus environment for our students, faculty and staff and is ready to welcome our community back to their campus home,” said Edward Serna, UMF president, as part of a prepared statement. “Some temporary changes on campus may reflect what is happening in communities across Maine. But Farmington’s purposeful and collective efforts will guide our success in protecting our community while meeting our students’ educational goals.”On-campus, in-person classes at UMF will begin on August 31, 2020, with an array of in-person, blended and online modalities. Beginning on Nov. 25, all course work will shift to remote learning for the remainder of the fall semester.New policies and safeguards, such as the use of face coverings, social distancing and the limitation of the size of gatherings are being incorporated into a plan to help limit the spread of Covid-19 and protect the campus and local community. A safety kit, including two face coverings, hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes will be given to each student upon their arrival.The University of Maine System has signed a contract with Jackson Laboratories and ConvenientMD to assist in campus COVID-19 testing efforts. Students, staff, and faculty returning from out of state will be required to arrive with a negative COVID-19 test result. Testing strategies and logistics are still being developed by the University of Maine System Scientific Advisory Board to accommodate all of the UMS universities, including Farmington.Residence Halls will be open this fall with a complement of living options. Dining Services will be provided, and the dining halls and retail operations have been updated for social distancing and safety. Self-service options will no longer be available.UMF plans to have NCAA fall seasons that are compliant with national guidelines. It anticipates competitive schedules to be shorter with more localized competition. Sport by sport guidelines continue to be refined with a focus on creating quality team experiences.Facilities Management has been working to modify campus into an appropriately distanced and sanitized environment. Classroom layoutsare being adjusted to allow for a minimum of six feet of physical distancing between individuals. Hand sanitizer stations are being installed all over campus and each classroom will be equipped with hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes.The University’s goal is to offer the safest experience possible to the campus community, UMF said in the statement, while providing the high quality and supportive educational experiences Farmington is known for.Additional information and continued updates will be available on the UMF “Return to Campus” website as it becomes available. https://www.umf.maine.edu/return/For more information on the University of Maine System’s Together for Maine guide visit: together for Maine principles [PDF].last_img read more

Flyers stay perfect after OT win vs. Grande Prairie

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – The Fort St. John Flyers continued their winning streak this past weekend on the road in Grande Prairie.Playing against the Athletics on Thursday night, the Flyers got caught as the Athletics scored first 58 seconds into the opening frame. Fort St. John battled back, and Robbie Sidhu evened things up with just over 6:30 left in the first assisted by Josh Bruha and Daylen Pearson.Fort St. John got a pair of go-ahead goals in the second period. Just over two minutes in, Brennan GIroux made it 2-1 with an unassistedd tally, before Cole Calliou added some insurance halfway through the second assisted by Pearson.- Advertisement -Grande Prairie had a pair of answers of their own in the third period, scoring with just 1:28 left to force overtime.In the 3-on-3 extra frame, it only took the Flyer 45 seconds to find the back of the Athletics’ net. Marshall Sidwell sealed the deal for the Flyers in sudden death assisted by Sidhu to keep the Flyers’ unbeaten streak alive.The Flyers are back on home ice this Thursday night as they face off against the Dawson Creek Senior Canucks. The warm-up starts at 8:00 p.m., with the puck drop at 8:30.Advertisementlast_img read more

Public campaign funding urged

first_img “This isn’t a decision for the City Council to make. It’s a decision for the people of Los Angeles to make,” said Garcetti, whose father, former district attorney Gil Garcetti, presides over the Ethics Commission. “Democracy comes at a price, but it’s a cheap price to pay for giving our government back to the people.” Council members Garcetti, Wendy Greuel and Bill Rosendahl first proposed public campaign financing in July. The commission’s action came as it approved penalties in two corruption cases involving prominent officials and supporters. The commission approved a $105,271 fine against former Councilman Martin Ludlow to settle violations stemming from his 2003 council campaign. It was the maximum penalty the city could impose for Ludlow’s offense. Ludlow admits he accepted contributions above the $500 limit by coordinating the use of $32,490 in staff time and equipment from Service Employees International Union Local 99 to his campaign. He then concealed the illegal activity. Ludlow has pleaded guilty to state charges and has agreed to plead guilty to federal charges in the case, and is banned from holding public office for four years and from working for a union for 13 years. The councilman left office last year to head the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, but stepped down from that post last month in agreeing to cooperate with authorities. “Mr. Ludlow has acknowledged that mistakes were made, but he’s taken full responsibility for his actions,” said Ludlow’s attorney. Stephen J. Kaufman, adding that penalties will be paid in part through Ludlow’s defense fund. Separately, the commission voted 3-0 to approve a $147,000 penalty against attorney Pierce O’Donnell, who admitted to using $25,500 of his own money to reimburse friends, relatives and employees for contributions to the campaign of former Mayor James Hahn. He also failed to disclose a $25,000 independent expenditure in a timely matter, as required. O’Donnell had previously reached an agreement with the District Attorney’s Office to pay a $155,280 fine in the criminal case. He also agreed Tuesday to pay an additional $72,000 fine levied by the state Fair Political Practices Commission in Sacramento. “We consider laundering of campaign contributions to be one of the most serious violations of the Political Reform Act,” John Appelbaum, chief of the FPPC’s enforcement division, said in a written statement. “This case involved 26 separate counts of laundering. Laundering conceals the identity of the actual donor and thwarts campaign contribution limits.” O’Donnell’s attorneys declined to comment. Last summer, some of L.A.’s City Council members asked for a study of public financing of elections. Just prior to that, Hahn’s administration had been under criminal investigation into allegations that companies were compelled to make campaign contributions to get city business. Clean-money campaigns have gained state and national attention with scandals involving lobbyist Jack Abramoff, former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and others in Congress. State legislation is making its way through Sacramento while the California Nurses Association is trying to get a campaign reform initiative on the November ballot. Supporters say public financing of campaigns lessens the influence of donors and encourages more candidates, while detractors say it’s a waste of taxpayer funds. Gil Garcetti said he remembers the “tremendous burden” of having to raise campaign cash for his run for district attorney – while also trying to do his job. Already, the city budget provides $2.6 million annually to provide public matching funds. Nearly $5 million to $7 million more would be needed to fully fund the campaigns. Bob Stern of the Center for Governmental Studies was optimistic about the city’s effort to look at reform. “It’s better than I thought it would be,” he said. “But it has a long ways to go.” Lisa Mascaro, (818) 713-3761 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The city Ethics Commission set the stage Tuesday for a massive overhaul of the way candidates raise money for elected office, as it handed down $250,000 in penalties in two high-profile corruption cases. Los Angeles is considering full public financing of elections, part of a growing civic trend to stem the influence political donors have on City Hall. Commission President Gil Garcetti said he’s never seen such an outpouring of public support for an issue since he took the helm of the commission three years ago. “It’s time, and we have to move forward,” Garcetti said. “The only problem … is both the will and finding the money.” Officials estimate it could cost at least $9 million annually to fund all city elections, including those for mayor and City Council. But clean-money supporters welcomed the city’s pursuit of publicly financed elections, saying Los Angeles could take the lead in the growing national trend. “It would make a big difference – for us, a big city, to do this would send a real signal,” said Julia Maher, a neighborhood activist from West Los Angeles. “It needs to be simple. We are the people. We elect our representatives.” The commission – which has no authority to change laws or put the issue on the ballot, as would be required – directed its staff to report next month with a public-funding proposal to take to the City Council. Council President Eric Garcetti hopes to put a proposal before voters by November or spring 2007. last_img read more

Barry Hall apologises after being sacked for vulgar on-air comments

first_imgFL great Barry Hall has apologised for vulgar comments he made on live radio, saying it was “a silly thing to say and not a reflection of who I am”.Triple M sacked Hall immediately after his remarks to co-commentator Leigh Montagna during a pre-game chat at Friday night’s clash between the Western Bulldogs and Geelong, in which he commented about the impending birth of Montagna’s child. Hall also apologised to the former St Kilda player Montagna and his wife Erin, and wished them well with the arrival of their first baby, which is due next week.“Once, again, I am sorry, I should not have said such an inappropriate comment on air and hope I can be forgiven and move forward from here,” he said.Triple M released a statement on Friday night following the incident at Etihad Stadium.“Tonight on Triple M Football, there were unacceptable and inappropriate comments made by a member of the commentary team,” head of content Mike Fitzpatrick said.“The commentator was removed immediately from the broadcast and an apology was issued on air afterwards. Immediate action was taken with the termination of employment for one team member.”Hall was said to be filling in for Chris Judd during the broadcast.Considered one of the best forwards of the modern era, the 41-year-old played 289 games for Saints, Sydney and the Bulldogs, kicking 746 goals. He also captained the Swans to their 2005 premiership. Share on Messenger Australian rules football Share via Email Since you’re here… Australia sport From collection to analysis: sports data and its profound impact on the AFL Topics Share on LinkedIn Read more Reuse this content “I’d like to take this opportunity to apologise for any offence taken from my commentary on Friday night’s Triple M footy coverage,” Hall told News Corp Australia.“It was a silly thing to say and it is not a reflection of who I am or what my views are. I am a proud father and dedicated partner and have nothing but respect for women.”Sign up to receive the latest Australian sports stories every day AFL Share on Twitter Support The Guardian news Share on Pinterest Share on WhatsApp … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Facebooklast_img read more

World Rugby says plans for Nations Championship will include relegation

first_imgnews World Rugby came under considerable fire last week after reports that its Nations Championship would feature the Six Nations and the Rugby Championship sides, as well as the USA and Japan, and that there would be no promotion or relegation for 12 years. There was also a backlash from senior players including the England captain, Owen Farrell, amid fears their welfare was being ignored as well as the threat of Fiji, Samoa and Tonga boycotting the World Cup.In a statement issued on Wednesday however, World Rugby revealed its original proposal – made to the relevant unions last September – which includes relegation from both the Six Nations and a six-team Rugby Championship, also featuring Japan and Fiji (the next two highest teams in the world rankings), referred to as the Rest of the World.Under the proposal the competition would start in 2022, be held in its full form every two years – but not in World Cup years – and a truncated version in British & Irish Lions years. One team from the Six Nations and one from the Rest of the World would face relegation each time the competition is played in full, or every two years. Share on Facebook Pacific Islands’ uproar is justified. So what about their Super Rugby exclusion? “With the proposed model incorporating competitions that are not owned or run by World Rugby, not all unions are presently in favour of immediate promotion and relegation. We continue to consider the feedback, but remain absolutely committed to an eventual pathway for all.”World Rugby is also seeking to address the players’ concerns and will meet the International Rugby Players Council, of which Farrell and Johnny Sexton are members, on Monday. The council has also said it will convene again next week to discuss World Rugby’s latest proposals. Rugby union Read more World Rugby Robert Kitson Support The Guardian World Rugby has insisted promotion and relegation will be a part of its proposed new world league despite opposition from within the Six Nations. The global governing body has also staunchly defended its proposal – described as “undercooked” by the Rugby Football Union – and responded to accusations it was planning to exclude the Pacific Islands. Rugby union’s World League plans risk forfeiting the game’s soul World Rugby’s decision to go public comes before the emergency meeting next week in Dublin – called by the governing body’s chairman, Bill Beaumont – where representatives from all tier one nations, as well as Japan and Fiji, will be present. Support for World Rugby’s September proposal is far from unanimous – leading to a number of different suggestions including that which leaked last week – with promotion and relegation the main stumbling block. It remains to be seen if and how it can be overcome at next week’s meeting.“Contrary to reports our proposed competition provides opportunities for all teams to compete at the top level on merit, with promotion and relegation,” read World Rugby’s statement. “Under this model, the Pacific Islands and all teams outside the current Six Nations and the Rugby Championship would have a potential pathway. Bret Harris Topicscenter_img Since you’re here… Share on Messenger The Breakdown: sign up and get our weekly rugby union email. Six Nations Share on WhatsApp … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Twitter Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Share on Pinterest Read more Rugby Championship Reuse this contentlast_img read more