US – Newly-released FBI documents show agency’s impersonation of journalists

first_img June 3, 2021 Find out more Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says October 18, 2018 US – Newly-released FBI documents show agency’s impersonation of journalists News RSF_en WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists June 7, 2021 Find out more “The FBI’s impersonation of journalists and filmmakers is of great concern to the press freedom community,” said Margaux Ewen, Director of RSF’s North America bureau. “Any uncertainty regarding a journalist or filmmaker’s identity and motives for investigation can seriously hinder the media’s news-gathering abilities, and can endanger those working among hostile actors, who may use this program as an excuse to target or strong-arm journalists.” News The US ranks 45th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index after falling 2 places in the last year. Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is concerned by the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) guidelines for impersonating journalists as part of covert activities and operations, which were made public on October 5. These documents provide new insight into a program that poses a threat to the credibility of independent journalists. United StatesAmericas center_img April 28, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Organisation Help by sharing this information The FBI publicly released on October 5 its guidelines for impersonating journalists and documentary filmmakers as part of its covert activities and operations. This was made possible after the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press (RCFP) filed a lawsuit under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) due to the agency’s failure to respond to a request for information concerning the impersonation of documentarians. Included in these guidelines is the procedure FBI employees must follow to obtain approval for impersonating a member of the news media, which includes submitting an application to the Undercover Review Committee at FBI headquarters and receiving consent from the FBI Deputy Director, who must first consult with the Deputy Attorney General. The guidelines do not, however, outline the criteria that the Deputy Director and Deputy Attorney General consider when approving these requests. to go further News United StatesAmericas News Follow the news on United States Along with RCFP’s legal arguments in its lawsuit, two documentary filmmakers—David Byars and Abby Ellis— submitted signed affidavits stating the agency’s impersonation schemes have made their jobs more difficult. While the FBI has impersonated documentary filmmakers and journalists undercover for decades, these documents outline never-before-seen specifics of the agency’s guidelines. Attention to this controversial practice intensified in 2014 when then-FBI Director James Comey revealed an agent had posed as an Associated Press reporter years prior during a criminal investigation. It remains unknown how often the agency has relied on this tactic to elicit information.last_img read more

After move from quarterback to running back, JB Lewis has been ‘the dude’ for Fortuna this season

first_imgFortuna >> As the summer months progressed in the Friendly City, Fortuna head coach Mike Benbow and offensive coordinator Clint Duey put forth a question for senior JB Lewis.In short, it was this: What if we moved you from quarterback to running back?For some, that might ruffle some feathers knowing they’d be going from the most prominent position to one that has him working for every yard he will be picking up.But for Lewis, a selfless decision to hand the keys of the Huskies’ offense over …last_img

Sharks decimated by injuries in disastrous Game 5 loss

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.SAN JOSE — Nobody in the NHL is fully healthy this deep in the playoffs, as any coach or player will tell you.But the San Jose Sharks are suffering to a degree rarely seen after a 5-0 Game 5 loss to the St. Louis Blues.They lost four players to apparent injury during Game 5: defenseman Erik Karlsson, forwards Tomas Hertl and Joonas Donskoi, and captain Joe Pavelski. In the third period, they were down to nine men on …last_img

Fishing the North Coast: Rain on the way, Smith could open

first_imgIf you’ve been waiting for your shot at some Smith River kings, you may get your wish this weekend. It seems likely there won’t be enough rain to open the Humboldt rivers that are currently closed due to low flows, but up in Crescent City, the Smith River could come into play. According to Kathleen Zontos of Eureka’s National Weather Service, the Smith River basin could see up to two inches of rain at the coast and possibly three in the higher elevations. If that comes to fruition, the levels …last_img

A map fit for a king

first_imgA portrait of Francois le Vaillant, the French explorer and naturalist. Le Vaillant’s famous giraffe illustration, with him in the foreground.(Images: Iziko South African Museum) The map features numerous wild animal species, three of which are now extinct.(Image: MapMyWay)MEDIA CONTACTS • Prof Ian GlennHead, Department of Media Studies,University of Cape Town+27 82 788 4253Lucille Davie“I returned, so to speak, to man’s primitive state, and breathed, for the first time in my life, the pure and delicious air of freedom,” wrote the explorer, naturalist and social commentator, Francois le Vaillant, of his adventures in South Africa, between the years 1781 and 1784.Le Vaillant was instrumental in creating a large, painted cotton map of South Africa for the French monarch, King Louis XVI, measuring some 3m by 2m in size. It is the centrepiece of the exhibition The King’s Map, Francois le Vaillant in Southern Africa: 1781-1784, which is on at the Iziko South African Museum in Cape Town until the end of May.Drawn 222 years ago, this is the first time the map has been seen in public, thanks to former French ambassador Jacques Lapouge, who was the driving force in getting permission for it to be brought to South Africa.The exhibition is part of the French Season 2012/2013, a multifaceted bilateral collaboration between France and South Africa. Its purpose is to strengthen relations between the two countries through exchanges of cultural, commercial and social initiatives, while promoting an awareness of French culture through a series of events and exhibitions.Recognised as the first modern ornithologist and taxidermist, Le Vaillant produced watercolours and maps, and captured his adventures in a number of volumes on his return to France. In these, he painted a picture of the peoples of South Africa at the time.The exhibition is curated by Ian Glenn, the professor of media studies at the University of Cape Town. He has written extensively on Le Vaillant, including a biography on his military career, his role at the Cape, and his political affiliations during and after the French Revolution. He has also co-authored two books: François Levaillant and the Birds of Africa (2004), and Travels into the Interior of Africa via the Cape of Good Hope, Vol 1 (2007).“When I first learned that there had been a map lavishly produced under the instruction of François le Vaillant for King Louis XVI in 1790, I was determined to see it,” says Glenn. “The map, originally stored in a naval archive, had been moved from one archive to another to escape destruction during World Wars I and II in France.”He finally traced it to Paris. “When I eventually saw it in the map archives of the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, I hoped a South African public would one day share my pleasure in the most beautiful and striking map ever produced of Southern Africa.”But there was some doubt about it being taken out of storage and displayed, given its value and fragile state. “We owe an enormous debt to the French Cultural Services in South Africa for persuading the Bibliothèque Nationale to let the map [be] exhibited in the land that inspired it,” Glenn adds.Rare and valuable worksThe map is on show alongside with other rare and valuable works by Le Vaillant, including a selection of watercolours belonging to the Library of the South African Parliament in Cape Town, original bird illustrations for his Oiseaux d’Afrique and elephant folio versions of his bird books from the Brenthurst Library in Johannesburg.The biodiversity and range of animals he came across while travelling in the interior is depicted on the map, including three that are now extinct – the kwagga, the Cape warthog, and the bloubok. It contains 66 illustrations of animals, birds, and plants, as well as four cartouches or decorative panels showing different indigenous groups he encountered.Le Vaillant left an impressive legacy – besides the bird books, illustrated maps, travel accounts and paintings, he took back animal specimens, in particular the skeleton and skin of a giraffe. To acknowledge his taxidermy skills, a huge stuffed giraffe greets visitors at the entrance to the exhibition.It also has interactive elements – a video with modern day images of the places he recorded on his map, an interactive display of the map on touch screens, and a large replica of his map on the floor at the entrance, allowing visitors to walk the routes he travelled.Rust en VreugdThe house in which Le Vaillant stayed for part of his sojourn in Cape Town, Rust en Vreugd, and where he catalogued his collections, still exists. Today, it is one of the 12 Iziko museums in Western Cape. The late 18th century townhouse is on Buitenkant Street in the city bowl.His journeys took in the colony and its boundaries: one was made around Cape Town and Saldanha Bay; another out eastwards from the Cape, lasting 16 months; and on the third he journeyed north of the Orange River and into Great Namaqualand.There is a possibility that a replica of his map will be made and put on permanent display in Rust en Vreugd.On his return to France, Le Vaillant published two volumes of Voyage dans l’Intérieur de l’Afrique in 1790, and in 1796, he published three volumes of the second Voyage dans l’Intérieur de l’Afrique, all of which were translated into several languages. He also published six volumes of Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux d’Afrique, between 1796 and 1808, with drawings by Jacques Barraband; Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux de Paradis, between 1801 and 1806; Histoire Naturelle des Cotingas et des Todiers in 1804; and Histoire Naturelle des Calaos in 1804.His publications were widely distributed in Europe, introducing the southern African interior to Europeans. They helped to dispel incorrect perceptions of Africa. His illustrations also often influenced scientific names, and he named several birds. He sent over 2 000 bird skins to Europe.Illustrations of travelsOn display in the exhibition are illustrations of Cape Town; an image of Kees, a tame baboon that travelled with him; several camps at Plettenberg Bay and the Great Fish River; wagons crossing the Olifants River; and of the beautiful Narina, a Gonaqua woman with whom some say he became infatuated. The rare Narina Trogon bird is named after her. A friend and hero to Le Vaillant, the Hottentot Klaas, is portrayed looking regal and elegant. Klaas saved Le Vaillant’s life.Several exquisitely detailed botanical images line the walls. Alongside some of the bird illustrations are musical annotations – his efforts to describe the song of the particular bird. Le Vaillant pioneered the display of stuffed birds in lifelike poses.“Le Vaillant played a major role in establishing how Europe saw the Cape,” explains Glenn. “He attempted to represent his South African experience in many ways – from the production of specimens, to lavishly illustrated bird books and travel accounts, and to innovative maps.“In so doing, he created more than a single influential text, but rather a range of texts that shaped what came after him, both here and elsewhere. This work helped shape many modern media, genres and intellectual traditions. In many ways Le Vaillant is a founding figure of South African culture.”Le Vaillant died at the age of 71 in his country house in France.last_img read more

BAHAMAS National Public Health Laboratory Receives Food Testing Equipment

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, March 14, 2018 – Providenciales – The Ministry of Health, Agriculture, Sports and Human Services, through The Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), receives the donation of a much needed piece of food testing equipment, “The Stomacher” food homogenizer as part of their hurricane relief efforts.This instrument will be very important to the pioneering of food testing in the Turks and Caicos Islands.  The National Public Health Laboratory will be opened in the upcoming months and will provide a means of testing food and water.  Food testing was formerly conducted on a small scale in the Grand Turk Hospital Laboratory, but since the closure of this facility food testing has been suspended.  It is indeed a wonderful opportunity to see the commencement of food and water testing on a wide scale in the Turks and Caicos Islands.The stomacher is manufactured to industrial standards.  The circulator allows for easy and effective processing of multiple samples, without the risk of cross contamination.  “The Stomacher” owing to the quality of construction and components, is highly durable and reliable, ensuring consistent homogenization during frequent use.  It will provide for greater efficiency and quality because the samples are processed in their own individually sealed bags without any contact with the inside of the machine.  This eliminates the need for washing and sterilizing in between samples.CARPHA also supplied some ELISA kits for testing infectious diseases. We are grateful to the Caribbean Public Health Agency for these wonderful contributions.For more information, contact the National Public Health laboratory on 338-5132Release: TCIG Related Items:last_img read more

Possible new explanation found for sudden demise of Khmer Empire

first_img Explore further Did Climate Influence Angkor’s Collapse? Now, work by a group of scientists indicates it may have been due to drought. The group, led by Mary Beth Day, an earth scientist with the University of Cambridge, is to have the results of their efforts published in a report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The Khmer Empire existed from the period between the 9th and 15th centuries and was centered around the city of Angkor. During that time, it’s very clear that great effort was put into capturing massive amounts of water that came from the skies during the monsoon seasons in the summer, to support drinking and crop growing during the rest of the year. The system apparently worked great for a long time, then suddenly didn’t. The reasons put forth for this sudden change have varied, from disease or warfare, to public strife, to changing environmental conditions. Now, it appears due to this latest research, that at least one of the major factors was indeed environmental.To find out if the problem was a dearth of water due to changes in the weather or the water system, the team took soil samples from one of the largest reservoirs (called barays) built by the Angkor people. Digging down as far as six feet, the team found that prolonged drought and perhaps overuse of the soil for farming may have led to a society unable to feed itself, a sure and straight path to an untimely demise if ever there was one.In studying the soil samples, the team was able to see sediment deposits that had built up on the bottom of the baray over time. During the years leading up to 1431, thinner layers indicted less water became available for storage. They also showed that the rainfall was more erratic. Instead of steady rains during the monsoon seasons, huge storms would erupt flooding farmlands and dumping massive amounts of soil into the baray, which were then followed by periods of no rain at all. The result was much less water available for drinking and growing crops during the drier seasons, and possible destruction of crops that the people were able to grow, due to flooding.This new research doesn’t prove for a fact that it was drought that led to the demise of the Khmer Empire, of course, as there were other factors involved. War with neighbors, the conversion of many of the inhabitants to Buddhism, and natural dispersion due to increasing trade with other countries, all likely had a hand. But it does appear that changing weather patterns might have been the final straw. © 2011 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — The Khmer Empire, known to many as the Angkor Civilization, was a society of people that lived for several centuries in Southeast Asia in what is now Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and Viet Nam. What has kept the memory of the empire alive are the huge structures built by the people who lived in the area during that time. Also of note were the roadways, canals and water movement and storage systems that were constructed to support a large population. But like many other lost cultures, what was once a flourishing metropolis, in a very short period of time, gave way to collapse.center_img Map of Southeast Asia circa 900 CE, showing the Khmer Empire in red, Champa in yellow and Haripunjaya in light Green plus additional surrounding states. Image: Wikipedia. Citation: Possible new explanation found for sudden demise of Khmer Empire (2012, January 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-explanation-sudden-demise-khmer-empire.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more