Greater efforts must be made to realize every persons right to food

5 March 2009With the number of hungry people around the world surging amid the current global financial crisis and the effects of climate change, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today stressed the need to scale-up efforts to combat hunger and realize every person’s right to food. With the number of hungry people around the world surging amid the current global financial crisis and the effects of climate change, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today stressed the need to scale-up efforts to combat hunger and realize every person’s right to food.“Food is not just a commodity, and agriculture is not just a business. Both are central to survival. Realizing every person’s right to food is a moral and humanitarian imperative,” Mr. Ban told students of the UN International School at a conference on the global food crisis.The Secretary-General said that the way the world grows, markets and trades food does not protect the poor, and the situation is getting worse. “Between global warming and the financial crisis, the number of hungry people is surging.”Last year saw an unprecedented movement of farmers, community groups, businesses, governments, the UN and development organizations working together to tackle the food crisis, in what Mr. Ban described as “the largest emergency scale-up against hunger and malnutrition in history.”Donors have pledged more aid, and the international community has held a series of emergency meetings, but the main work is in communities and countries, he noted. “That is where we are using food assistance and giving seeds and fertilizers to farmers. That is where we are helping communities adapt to climate change and building roads and storage centres so that produce can get to market.”Nevertheless, the global community needs to do even more this year, Mr. Ban stated. The UN is moving on two fronts: delivering immediate food and nutrition assistance, and improving longer-term food production and agricultural development. In addition, it is pushing for a fairer world trade system that works for poor people while combating climate change.The way out of the crisis, he noted, is to tackle the urgent challenges while fixing the underlying problem. “Hunger is a stain on humanity,” he asserted. “The time has come to remove that stain – forever.” read more

Former Ohio State football player Ray Small arrested on drug charges

Courtesy of MCTFormer Ohio State football player Ray Small was behind bars Friday morning after being arrested the previous night on numerous drug and gun charges.Small, 26, was indicted on a total of six felony drug possession and trafficking charges that were filed July 10.According to Columbus Division of Police, Small was held in the Franklin County jail after the gang unit found him in a condominium in Whitehall.The charges against Small were from an April search of his apartment in north Columbus.The indictment issued for Small said authorities captured drugs including heroin and oxycodone in addition to a semi-automatic handgun and assault rifle. Another man, Anthony Jones of Detroit, was also named in the indictment for being connected with the alleged crimes.Small was caught up in the 2010 Buckeyes football memorabilia scandal, telling The Lantern he sold rings and other valuables for money. He also posted a video to YouTube in May apologizing to former OSU coach Jim Tressel among others for his role in the scandal as well as his drug problem. Small cites his upbringing in the video, saying that he did not receive much discipline and that he is “truly sorry” for his actions.Small was also indicted on drug charges and after he was found to have more than 200 oxycontin tablets in Meigs County in 2012.According to Fox 28 in Columbus, Small could face up to 33 years in prison if convicted of all charges.Small played wide receiver and returned punts and kickoffs for OSU from 2006 to 2009. He totaled 61 receptions for 659 yards and three touchdowns in his career and returned a punt and a kickoff for touchdowns. read more